Vodafone Germany significantly upped pressure on incumbent Telekom Deutschland with the launch of its first fixed-mobile bundles and cheeky, EUR2bn (£1.8bn) Gigabit Investment Plan for next-generation network extension.

  • Interpreted by Royal Bank of Canada as a ‘tanks on lawn’ play aimed at Liberty Global; raising stakes without significantly duplicating assets, thus potentially spurring M&A activity. Deutsche Telkom’s budget vectoring strategy also further pressured.
  • Unusually ringfenced from rest of Group, capex uplift largely allocated to connecting 2,000 business parks and growing enterprise market share.
  • Remainder earmarked for accelerated deployment of gigabit-class upgrade of cable estate, and commercialisation of new municipal passive fibre networks in rural areas.

The Group gave Vodafone Germany (VfD) further licence to push Gigabit Company ambitions with the launch of a four-year, Project Spring-like fibre investment splurge. Although not obvious at headline-level, and so conveniently misinterpreted as massive expansion, this is an incremental, partnering move. The Gigabit Investment Plan — billed as “transformational” by VfD Chief Executive Hannes Ametsreiter — focuses on both cable and fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP) connections and is intended to help grow fixed-line market share by tapping into strengthening political, consumer and business demand for digitalisation and fibre. Recent federal election campaigning, where digitalisation and fibre have been key themes, appear to have been galvanising, with Ametsreiter specifically flagging creation of a “landing place for subsidies”, and referring to “politically strong signals”.

Over the period to end-2021, Vodafone will prioritise addition of 2, 000 choice business parks (Giga-Business), along with “next-generation network” (NGN) DOCSIS 3.1-led upgrade of current reach (Giga-Cable), plus some expansion via municipal-partnered rural access (Giga-Municipality).The new programme appears to rest heavily on (as-yet-uncompleted) “co-investment” agreements, with significant outlay only on VfD’s part for Giga-Business. In aggregate, the OpCo plans “incremental” capital expenditure (capex) of at least EUR2bn (£1.8bn) by 31 December 2021 (encompassing four full calendar years, from 2018). This positions the Gigabit Investment Plan as a near-30% add-on to VfD’s capex over that period, based on the EUR1.67bn it reported during its last full financial year (FY16-17, to 31 March 2017). However, it was also at pains to emphasise capital efficiency, which will see expenditure phased and actual cash outlay significantly lower.

In return, VfD expects to generate uplift in both service revenue (one-to-two percentage points from FY19-20) and core earnings margin (undefined, but a “material” increase).

  • Vodafone’s central leadership was typically keen to stress expectations of return from the Plan, with a ‘highly cash efficient… success-based’ de-risked model, and that the splurge does not represent a departure from the Group’s “disciplined investment criteria”. Around EUR400m cash return is projected on the phased outlay. Particularly interesting, was that the Plan’s outlay is to be reported separately from Group capital expenditure (capex) in Vodafone’s results, and will, therefore — for presentation’s sake, at least — sidestep violation of Group Chief Financial Officer Nick Read’s “mid-teens” capital intensity outlook range. As well as Ametsreiter’s prominence in the Plan’s announcement, this desire not to ‘spoil the figures’ could be read as a sign that the programme is VfD-instigated, and not led from the centre. This is despite evident strategic benefits to Group headquarters, both in terms of getting its largest OpCo properly firing, post-downturn, and placing additional competitive pressure on both incumbent Deutsche Telekom and M&A buddy Liberty Global (which owns Germany’s number-two cableco Unitymedia). Read acknowledged the Liberty-complementary nature of the new plan (no overbuild), but also said it was a discrete VfD project with no consultation. Also apparent is that other fibre build projects will be considered on a ‘case-by-case’ basis within Germany and other OpCos, although none is currently comparable in scale (including possible tie-up with Openreach in the UK).

Practically, the Plan professes to “deliver around 13.7 million new gigabit connections to German consumers and enterprises”. In reality, this represents upgrading the current 12.6 million ‘marketable’ premises passed by Kabel Deutschland’s (KDG) cable network to become gigabit-ready, plus extending reach to a further one million rural premises via municipal dark fibre partnership, as well as encompassing a further 100, 000 businesses at a favoured 2, 000 of Germany’s 30, 000 business parks.

Many details of the programme remain unclear, and other OpCos have been known to change tack, mid-programme, if other, more efficient rollout options present themselves (such as M&A, “enhanced” wholesale deals, or partnerships).

Individual elements of the programme include:

  • Investment of EUR1.4bn-EUR1.6bn on fibre rollout to business parks. This — the main facet of the programme — represents an extension of VfD’s ambitions well beyond an enterprise-oriented fibre rollout partnership flagged by VfD and upstart Deutsche Glasfaser (DG) in July 2017 (Vodafonewatch, #157). When announcing the DG tie-up, VfD envisaged extending FTTP to around 5, 000 businesses in 19 parks by 31 December 2018. Now, under the broader and longer-reaching Gigabit Investment Plan, it is targeting 100, 000 companies (with 40% minimum penetration) in around 2, 000 parks by 31 December 2021. DG will be involved in the enlarged business zone plan, receiving one-third of fees upfront, followed by instalment payments, although the level of its overall contribution is not yet clear. DG could have a key role as pathfinder, too, with ‘reference’ parks potentially important to achieve ‘impetus’ for critical pre-sales and localised partnerships. Further, in a cost-spreading exercise, VfD is seeking to form “strategic relationships” with a “number of” other partners, with either “specialist fibre skills or relevant infrastructure assets”, engaging them to deploy passive infrastructure and then taking ownership of those assets “over the long-term”. Vodafone also indicated that it is seeking to raise its enterprise market share from current sub-15%, and, presumably, ultimately envisages monetisation through multi-play and services as well as fixed connectivity (the OpCo noted that fewer than 25% its enterprise customers are currently ‘converged’). Parameters used to shortlist business parks will include revenue potential and proximity to existing infrastructure, with the target payback period per park being four years, with 20%-plus IRR. For guidance, income of around EUR1.8m per year is anticipated from a typical park, and Vodafone does not expect this area to be affected by regulation.
  • Spend of EUR200m-EUR400m on rural NGN rollout, in partnership with local municipalities, anchored by Germany’s broadband funding programme. This element envisages extension of VfD gigabit connections to “around one million” consumer households, but involves the municipality, rather than VfD, deploying, owning and leasing the passive infrastructure. Vodafone indicated that it expects domestic fibre subsidies to increase (to an anticipated EUR3bn in 2018, potentially to an ultimate EUR24bn, and to become fibre-specific), and also that the municipal networks will be pre-sold. Vodafone is targeting 33% minimum penetration, and six-year investment payback with 20%-plus IRR. It anticipates an ‘open access’ regulatory model due to public subsidies.
  • Outlay of EUR200m on upgrading VfD’s cable network to “gigabit speeds”. This seemingly does not involve expansion of the KDG footprint beyond the current 25, 000-50, 000 annual growth (and no planned ‘overbuild’ was emphasised), but instead focuses on “accelerating” speed enhancement via DOCSIS 3.1 (1Gbps-10Gbps capable) rollout, shifting beyond the OpCo’s existing, top-rate, “up-to-500Mbps” cable offering, based on DOCSIS 3.0, and ‘better leveraging’ existing assets. The new capability will become available during 2018, according to VfD, and the project will be completed more quickly than other Gigabit Investment Plan elements (within two years, as opposed to four). Although Vodafone is becoming increasingly fibre-oriented, DOCSIS 3.1-based cable network enhancement remains a prominent building block within Group Chief Technology Officer Johan Wibergh’s Gigabit Vodafone vision, and is already being conducted by Vodafone New Zealand and Vodafone Spain, alongside Huawei Technologies (Vodafonewatch, #139 and #151). VfD first flagged plans to deploy the technology in 2016, but has not disclosed partners or a firm timeframe (Vodafonewatch, #150). The investment case factors in ‘analogue switch off’, but excludes consumer premise equipment (to be funded from pre-ordained capex).

Within its supporting market analysis, Vodafone Germany showed itself almost matching incumbent Telekom Deutschland in terms of homes to which it can market NGN high-speed fixed services, at 26 million versus 28 million, with Unitymedia a distant third (13 million). It also showed 50% of its new cable customers now taking 200Mbps-plus services, up from 19% a year ago, and cable services now accounting for 53% of its broadband customer base (48% two years earlier). This latter data evidences the gap between the Gigabit Investment Plan headline figure of 12.6-13.7 million marketable gigabit premises and reality on the ground (around 3.3 million gigabit-capable cable connections), along with the fact that nearly half of the fixed-broadband customer base is still ADSL (37%) or VDSL (10%), although this might also be seen as highlighting the scale of opportunity. Vodafone credits itself with a 21% share of an EUR18bn fixed-line market, compared to 52% for DT and 12% for third-placed Unitymedia (with United Internet 10%, and Telefónica 5%).

VfD puts a bundle on ‘half gig’ speeds

The launch of the Gigabit Investment Plan came as VfD signalled a shift towards converged, fixed-mobile bundling, by releasing an “up-to-500Mbps” fixed-mobile “combi”.

The upshot is a “500MbpsGigaKombi — VfD’s somewhat hyperbolic brand name for its fixed-mobile bundles — in places where the OpCo’s cable and mobile network upgrades overlap. This is the fastest such bundled offer in Germany, although still some way short of true “gigabit” speeds.

VfD has thus achieved a previously stated aim of covering 20% of its hybrid-fibre-coaxial (HFC) footprint with an up-to-500Mbps service by end-summer 2017. The OpCo said network upgrades had been achieved in 100 cities, reaching 2.5 million households — meaning the 20% target has now been met.

Still advantage-Telekom, though

Strategically, both the Gigabit Investment Plan and 500Mbps GigaKombi offering give VfD yet more fuel to power its recent KDG-reliant return to growth, and to progress higher level attempts to jolt incumbent rival Telekom Deutschland into its own fibre investment splurge, onto which VfD could then piggyback (Vodafonewatch, passim).

VfD’s LTE claimed performance significantly exceeds that of Telekom, which is currently limited to a theoretical maximum of 300Mbps (it may shortly be boosted to 400Mbps). The incumbent’s top fixed-line speed, reliant on copper-based vectoring technology, is a sluggish 100Mbps. Through super vectoring, Telekom is hopeful of offering “up-to-250Mbps” fixed-broadband speeds by mid-2018.

Nonetheless, Telekom has a much larger installed base to target for upsell, and has been in the market with its flagship MagentaEINS converged bundles since 2014. It has seen faster-than-expected traction, signing up three million customers by 31 December 2016 — although this has led to questions over whether it has overcooked incentives in order to gain the customer retention boost provided by MagentaEINS uptake.

For now, VfD also faces significant geographical limitations when marketing GigaKombi. It launched up-to-500Mbps LTE services in ten cities during May 2017, and said it planned to extend that to 15 by end-summer 2017, and then to 30 by end-2017. However, this will still be well short of the equivalent cable offering’s footprint, and therefore limit the “500MbpsGigaKombi offering’s true reach.

The 500Mbps mobile broadband service is based on tri-band carrier aggregation, using equipment from Huawei Technologies, and pools spectrum together from the 800MHz, 1800MHz, and 2.6GHz frequency bands. Prior to 500Mbps, VfD’s top LTE speed was “up-to-375Mbps”, which was launched in September 2016 (Vodafonewatch, #148).

The customer care angle

Aside from the latest GigaKombi offer’s faster speeds, VfD is keen to emphasise value-for-money and better customer care than its rivals to Germany’s typically cautious consumers. VfD is charging customers EUR41.98 (£38.05)-per-month over the first year for the fastest combi-tariff, and claims this represents a saving of EUR10 versus separate mobile and fixed tariffs.

Moreover, all of Vodafone’s GigaKombi subscribers — not just those on the 500Mbps high-end tariff — are now entitled to compensation, in the shape of free mobile data, if their fixed network connection is disturbed or they have to wait longer than expected to get their GigaKombi fixed-line connection up and

running. Affected GigaKombi customers can book an additional data volume of 50GB on their mobile phone contract, which is valid for 16 days.

By paying attention to fixed-line niggles, VfD no doubt hopes to steal a march on Telekom. In early-2016, Ametsreiter said the incumbent should pay customers EUR250 in compensation when its engineers miss appointments (Vodafonewatch, #143). Waiting for a Telekom engineer, said the CEO, was “telco nuisance number one”. According to VfD, there are more than one million missed appointments each year related to the installation of new telephone or internet connections.

It remains to be seen if Telekom will respond with a similar compensation offer on its own ‘combi’ push. If the incumbent’s home engineer support is as lax as VfD claims, it could prove very onerous.

Signs of readiness for true fixed-mobile convergence push

Looking across the Group, the launch of GigaKombi signals what appears to be a more concerted convergence push within Vodafone, targeting European markets — such as Germany, the Netherlands, and Spain — where it sees “significant penetration potential” for multi-play offerings, and is prepared to stomach cannibalisation. As well as wireline footprint expansion and upgrades, progression of (some) OpCos’ billing systems, enabling visibility across mobile and fixed-line subscribers, has been a key enabler, although some businesses (most notably VfUK) have had major headaches upgrading their platforms, and true levels of readiness are not yet clear.

Vittorio Colao, Chief Executive of Vodafone, asserted in July 2017 that “a key strategic objective is to build long-lasting, converged, fixed and mobile relationships with customers”.

Image: © Vodafone (Flickr).

Table of Contents

EXECUTIVE BRIEF

Q1 FY17–18

Management update

Group continues to satisfice with slim Q1 growth

Faded to grey
Recovery via the scalpel
Figure 1 Vodafone Group, q-on-q ‘organic’ service revenue change, FY16-18
Table 1 Vodafone Group, revenue summary, Q1 FY17-18
Regions quarantined from sharp Indian and Dutch declines
Table 2 Mobile data analysis for twelve selected OpCos, Q1 FY17-18 (TB)
Group still nowhere near firing on all cylinders
Figure 2 Vodacom Tanzania, post-listing shareholder structure

Deals

Vodacom seeks partner buyout after Tanzanian IPO

A neat fit with Vodafone’s AMAP pivot
Table 3 Vodafone Africa presence, post-2017 Safaricom sale and VdT IPO
Now, for some shopping: Vodacom seeks to regain majority…
Table 4 Tanzanian operator subscription comparison, June 2017
… and VdT continues to work on local M&A openings
Wireline ambitions could be revived
No capex splurge coming, though

Ventures arm still on snooze as startups move on and up
Out of office
Table 5 Vodafone startup investments and interests, where known

Group Commercial

Vodafone Pass launch bids to soften ‘unlimited’ blow

Not “throwing in the towel” to unlimited — Colao
Table 6 Vodafone: energy-related headline data, FY16-17/31 March 2017

Colao gets hands-on as Consumer IoT portal nears launch

Can new in-Group upstart gain traction where others have failed?

VGE teams with Ingram Micro on smartphone entrance

Group Technology

Vodafone gives VMware ‘biggest ever’ telco win

Incomplete jigsaw
Cisco lands VfD SDN task

Vodafone adds Lime to OPEN RAN cocktail

Vodafone getting past its own vested interests
Innovate to accumulate
Radical radio

Vodafone backs open source IoT group

Security is a constant challenge for the entire IoT industry
Where prpl Foundation and Vodafone collide
Table 7 People movement highlights
Table 8 Partner/supplier people movement highlights

EUROPE REGION

Germany

VfD brandishes Gigabit Investment Plan

Table 9 Vodafone Europe: NGN marketable homes (million), Q1 FY17/18
Table 10 Germany’s broadband race: key contestants, 31 March 2017
VfD puts a bundle on ‘half gig’ speeds
Still advantage-Telekom, though
Table 11 Vodafone Europe Region, converged customers summary,
The customer care angle
Signs of readiness for true fixed-mobile convergence push

VfD puts 5G Mobility Lab in gear

Table 12 Motoring on: selected initial partners for 5G Mobility Lab
Revving up with different partners
Steering for pole position

Ireland

VfIr to launch VoLTE, Wi-Fi Calling in 2018

In eir’s slipstream
Table 13 VoLTE and Wi-Fi Calling launches by Vodafone OpCos to date

Spain

VfS suffers legal setback over ONO bonuses

Corporate responsibilities

UK

Openreach next in line for a Vodafone fibre combo

Table 14 Vodafone’s Europe Region ‘build, buy, and partner’ wireline agenda
Overreach risk with Openreach
Table 15 Vodafone Europe Region selected markets, fixed penetration, 30 June 2017
VfUK needs to pick an enemy

Talkmobile bows to inevitable, initiates MVNO shutdown

Under Read, Vodafone finally getting tougher with UK problem child
Early signs of some direction and consistency
As one door closes…

Vodafone UK steps up digital customer support

Table 16 Vodafone CXX initiative, key tenets
VfUK says it is getting a customer care grip, but sales drop continues
More signs of ‘Digital First’

AFRICA, MIDDLE EAST, AND ASIA PACIFIC REGION

Australia — Vodafone Hutchison Australia

VHA and NBN trade blows over wholesale pricing

Land grab? No thanks

India

Cisco’s SON tech now live in India

New Zealand

Sky and VfNZ seek to hit back after merger collapse…

… but VfNZ said to be going solo, via float

Qatar

VfQ suffers major network outage…

… seeks damage limitation via YOU FIRST loyalty scheme

Turkey

VfT quietly starts active-sharing trial with rival Avea

A small first step
Rural rundown: vendors now in place via back-to-back setup
Table 17 Major, publicised Vodafone network-sharing initiatives, to early-2017

Vodacom — Kenya

Huawei to boost Safaricom fibre output

An agenda item for new Vodacom relationship

Vodacom — South Africa

VdSA gets FTTH leg-up from more wholesale deals

The price is right?
MTN fibre JV still on the cards
Broadband Infraco buyout looks less likely

VdSA wins WOAN reprieve; spectrum squeeze continues

WOAN still on
SA spectrum constraints starting to show; rural rollout stalls

Billing issues continue to dog VdSA

Another Customer 3D headache

FURTHER READING

INDEX

Index

Symbols

3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) 29
5G Automotive Association 42

A

Aachen University of Technology 41
Actsoft.com 60
Aditya Birla Group 14
Idea Cellular 6, 9, 14, 66
AdMaxim 20
Affirmed Networks 20
Afilias Ltd
mTLD Top Level Domain Ltd. (dotMobi) 20
Africa 6, 9, 14, 57, 64, 68, 69, 70, 71, 73
Angola 14
– Congo 14
– Egypt 10, 32, 59
– Ghana 14, 64
– Guinea 14, 33
– Kenya 10, 14, 63, 64, 68, 69
Kenya Power & Lighting Company Ltd. 69
Lesotho 14
– Malawi 14
– Mozambique 14, 64
– Namibia 14
– Nigeria 14, 64
– Rwanda 14
– South Africa 4, 10, 13, 14, 17, 32, 60, 64, 65, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74
Competition Commission 14
– – Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (Icasa) 73
Tanzania 13, 14, 16, 17, 66, 68, 69
Tanzania Communications Regulatory Authority (TCRA) 69
Uganda 14, 64
– Zambia 14
– Zanzibar 16, 17
Afrimax Group 14
Agora Mobile 20
Alcatel-Lucent 33
Alfa Group
Altimo (Alfa Telecom International Mobile)
Turkcell (see Curkurova/TeliaSonera/separate) 33, 64
Amazon.com Inc. 53, 55, 61
Amdocs 60
American Express 59
American Express Company 59
Americas
Canada 18, 20, 33, 69
– USA 19, 20, 22, 25
States
New York 53
– – – Ohio 38
Apigee Corp. 20
Apple 39, 41, 59
iPhone 39
Argyle Data 20
Aricent Inc. 28
Arqiva 66
Asia-Pacific 25
Australia 58, 59, 66
National Broadband Network (NBN) 58, 59
China 42, 63, 68
– Fiji
Commerce Commission 61
India 6, 8, 9, 10, 14, 25, 32, 33, 54, 60, 66, 69
Department of Telecommunications (DoT) 14
– – Licence Circles 33
Japan 19, 42, 64
– Malaysia 14
– Mauritius 14
– New Zealand 33, 61, 63
Commerce Commission (New Zealand) 61
Singapore 14
– South Korea 65
ASSA ABLOY AB 47
Association of Licensed Telecommunications Operators (Alto, Ireland) 33
AT&T 18, 19, 28
Axiata Group Bhd (TM International)
India (Idea Cellular, see also Aditya Birla) 6, 9, 14, 66

B

Be Heard Group 55
Beintoo 20
Bharti Group 66
Airtel 16, 17, 66
– Indus Towers 25, 32, 66
BMW Group 42
Bosch Group, The 42
Botswana Telecommunications Corp. 14
Brilliant Telecommunications Inc. 20
Broadcom 31
BT Group 4, 28, 29, 30, 33, 47, 49, 50, 51
Openreach 4, 10, 33, 47, 48, 49, 50

C

Canonical 29
Caringo Inc. 20
Cavium Networks Inc. 31
CellEra Inc. 20
Central Vigilance Commission (CVC, India) 32
China Mobile 42
Christian Action Research and Education (CARE) 55
Ciena Corp. 28
Cisco Systems 27, 28, 33, 60
Cognia 20
Cukurova Holding
Turkcell (see Altimo/TeliaSonera/separate) 33, 64
CVC Capital Partners Group SICAV-FIS S.A. 32

D

Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange 13
Dell 26, 32
Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu 17, 45
Dennis Publishing 60
Deutsche Bank 61
Deutsche Telekom 19, 22, 24, 28, 30, 36, 42, 49
Europe
Netherlands 19
– – UK (EE) 51
Germany 36, 38, 39, 48
– T-Venture
Lantiq 31
USA 19, 22
Device Insight 20, 21
Digicel 33
Dixons Carphone 51

E

Eaton Towers 66
eBay
Expertmaker 19, 20
EE (see DT, FT) 51
Electricity Supply Board (Ireland) 48
Embee Mobile 20
EMC 26, 27, 32
VMware 26, 27
Enel SpA 44, 48
Ericsson 42
Etisalat 17
Europe 6, 8, 9, 10, 15, 18, 19, 22, 25, 30, 33, 35, 40, 48, 50
Austria 22
– Czech Republic 48
– France 14, 22
– Germany 6, 10, 20, 22, 36, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 44, 48, 50, 61, 66
Bundesnetzagentur für Elektrizität, Gas, Telekommunikation, Post und Eisenbahnen (BNetzA, RegTP, FNA, or German Federal Network Agency) 38
– – Länder
Bavaria (Munich) 39
– – – North Rhine-Westphalia (Düsseldorf) 42
Greece 10, 48, 66
– Hungary 48
– Ireland 20, 43, 48, 54, 55, 66
Commission for Communications Regulation (ComReg) 48
Italy 6, 10, 40, 44, 48, 50, 55, 66
– Luxembourg 19
– Netherlands 6, 9, 22, 33, 40, 41, 48, 50, 54, 66
– Poland 22
– Portugal 10, 48, 50, 66
– Romania 10, 48, 66
– Russia 32
– Spain 6, 10, 28, 40, 45, 47, 48, 49, 50, 66
Comision Nacional de los Mercados y la Competencia 49
Sweden 20
– Turkey 10, 21, 33, 43, 60, 63, 64, 65, 66
– United Kingdom (UK) 6, 10, 14, 20, 24, 25, 28, 29, 33, 40, 42, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 54, 55, 64, 66
Office of Communications (Ofcom) 48, 49, 50, 54
European Telecommunication Holding AG (ETH)
Millenicom 33
European Union 21, 44
European Commission 42, 44
Evolution Robotics Inc. 20
EWE
EWE Tel 38
Expway 42

F

Facebook 21, 52, 55
WhatsApp 39, 52, 53
FarCare 20
Finsphere Corp. 20
Flybits 18, 19, 20
Forthnet 48

G

Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) 42
GameGround 20
GCI 19
Outsourcery 19
Globacom Ltd 14
Google 41
Android 59
– JIBE 19, 20
GSM Association (GSMA) 15, 43, 66
Mobile World Congress 15, 29, 42

H

Headwater Partners 20
Helios Investment Partners
Helios Towers Africa, Ltd. 66, 68
HipLink Software (formerly Semotus Solutions)
Clickmarks 20
Huawei Technologies 18, 28, 37, 39, 42, 44, 60, 68, 69
Humin 20
Hutchison Whampoa 49
Vodafone Hutchison Australia Pty Ltd (VHA, (see Vodafone) 19, 43, 58, 59, 60, 66

I

IBM 53
Iliad 10
Indus Towers 25, 32, 66
INETCO Systems 20
InfraCo Management Services 71
Ingram Micro 25
Intel 28, 42
ItsOn 20

J

Juniper Networks 27
Brilliant Telecommunications 20

K

Kabel BW GmbH & Co. KG 38
KDDI 42
Kohlberg Kravis Roberts
Deutsche Glasfaser 37, 48
KPN 30, 48, 66

L

Largo Ltd
WIND Hellas 66
Lenovo 33
Liberty Global 4, 33, 36, 47, 49
UPC Germany GmbH
Unitymedia GmbH 36
Virgin Media 47, 48, 49, 50
– Ziggo 41, 48
Lime Micro 28, 29
Lite Access Technologies 69

M

Market segments
Contactless payment (NFC) 59
– Fixed broadband 43, 50
– Mobile broadband 4, 39, 73
– Mobile data 10, 16, 40
– Mobile virtual network (MVNA/MVNE/MVNO) 10, 33, 51, 52
– Network-sharing 48, 63, 64, 65, 66, 69
– Outsourcing 17, 66
– Over-the-top (OTT) 44
– Value-added services (VAS) 41, 51, 70
– Voice 4, 10, 18, 19, 20, 39, 41, 43, 44, 45, 53, 60, 70
MasterCard 59
Metroweb S.p.A. 48
Microsoft 41
Middle East
Egypt 10, 32, 59
– Israel 20
– Qatar 62, 66
Millicom International Cellular 17, 32
MIC Tanzania Limited (tiGO/ Mobitel/Buzz) 17, 32, 66, 68
– Tigo Ghana 16, 17, 32, 66, 68
mimik technology 20
MIPS 31
Mirambo Ltd 13, 15
MobileIron 19, 20, 25
MTN 33, 64, 70, 71
South Africa 71

N

Naratte 20
Naspers Limited (MIH Group) 60
NEC Corporation 24
Neotel (Pty) Ltd (SNO Telecommunications, see also Reliance) 71
Net Cologne 38
Netcracker Technology 33
Netflix Inc. 21, 44
New Zealand Warriors (Vodafone Warriors/Auckland Warriors) 61
Nexperience Ltd 20
Nokia 17, 42
NTT 30, 42, 64
Dimension Data 33, 64
Internet Solutions 64
Nuance Communications
SnapIn Software 20
NZ Communications
2degrees 61

O

OBS Medical 20
Oger Telecom
Avea 63, 64, 65, 66
Ooredoo 66
Oracle 25
Sun Microsystems
SavaJe Technologies 20
Orange
Orange 30, 32, 48, 66
– Romania 66
– Spain 48, 66
– UK (see EE) 51

P

Perfecto Mobile 19, 20
Phluido 28
Phones4U 17
Pontis 19, 20
Proximus Group 30
prpl Foundation 30, 31
PwC 17, 54

Q

Qualcomm 31, 42
Qualia Media 20
Quixey 20

R

RCS & RDS SA 48
Rogers Communications 33
RWE AG 42

S

Safaricom 10, 14, 17, 63, 64, 68, 69
Executives
Rerolle, Thibaud 69
M-PESA 33, 63
Samsung 15, 43
Singapore Telecom
Amobee Media Systems 20
– Optus (Australia) 58, 66
Skorpios Technologies 20
SK Telecom 28, 42
Sky Network Television 61
Smarsh 18
Cognia 18, 19, 20
Smart Telecom 16
Sonaecom 48
Optimus 48
Spotify Ltd 21
Sprint Nextel 32
Standard Life 17
SLI 17
Supreme Court 48
Swisscom 19
Fastweb 44, 48

T

TalkTalk Telecom Group plc 48
Taqua 20
Tata Group
Tata Communications
Neotel (see separate listing) 71
Technology
2G 19, 29, 65, 66, 68
GSM 15, 43, 66
3G 29, 66
– 4G 16, 18, 29, 43, 49, 65, 73
Long Term Evolution (LTE) 4, 10, 18, 29, 39, 41, 42, 43, 48, 59, 64
– – VoLTE (Voice-over-LTE) 43
5G 4, 26, 29, 41, 42, 44, 49, 64, 65
– Billing 74
– Cloud computing 17, 19, 25, 26, 27, 42, 44, 47
– CRM 74
– Data centre 21, 26
– DSL 48
– Femtocell 10
– Fibre 4, 10, 17, 33, 36, 37, 39, 44, 47, 48, 49, 50, 64, 66, 68, 69, 70, 71
FTTC 48
– – FTTP 36, 37, 47, 48, 49
FMC 40
– FTTH 48, 50, 68, 69, 70, 71
– IM 55
– IP 17, 43
– Linux 30
– M2M 19, 20, 30, 65
– MAN 68
– MMS 10
– Narrow Band Internet of Things (NB-IoT) 29
– NFC 59
– NGN 36, 37, 47, 48, 50
– NOC 69
– OSS 68
– OTA 29
– RAN 21, 28, 29
– R&D 28, 29, 41, 49
– RF 29, 73
– SIM 15, 65, 69
– Smartphone 20, 25, 33, 39, 43, 61, 68
– SMS 42, 62
– Spectrum 4, 16, 17, 19, 29, 39, 42, 44, 49, 58, 64, 65, 72, 73
700 MHz 16, 73
– – 800 MHz 39, 73
– – 900 MHz 16, 73
– – 1000 MHz 72
– – 1800 MHz 16, 39
– – 2100 MHz 16, 73
– – 2600 MHz 39, 73
– – Digital dividend 72
TETRA 39
– WAN 29
– W-LAN 4, 43
Telecom Egypt 14, 59
Telecom Infra Project 28
Telecom Italia 30, 44, 48
Teleena 33
Telefónica Group 19, 30, 38, 42, 48, 49, 64, 66
Europe
España 48
– – Ireland 66
– – UK 49, 64, 66
TeliaSonera 30, 64
Turkcell (see Alfa/Curkurova/separate) 33, 64
Telkom South Africa 71
Telstra 28, 58
Texas Instruments 28
Texas Pacific Group (TPG) 58
TPG Capital 58
Tiscali 44
Top Optimized Technologies 20
Turkcell (see Alfa/Curkurova/TeliaSonera) 33, 64
Twenty-First Century Fox
Sky
Sky Italia 44
Twitter Inc. 52

U

United Internet
1&1 Internet 38
UPC 48

V

Vasona Networks 20
Verizon Communications 7, 18, 19, 28, 42
Verizon Wireless 7, 19
Viettel Group 69
Visa 59
PlaySpan 20
VisionOSS (VOSS) 20
Vocus Communications 58
Vodacom Group 4, 10, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 32, 63, 64, 65, 66, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74
Congo 14
– Gateway Communications 30
– Group 10, 13, 14, 32, 64, 65, 69, 71, 73, 74
– Lesotho 14
– Mozambique 14, 64
– South Africa 4, 10, 13, 14, 17, 32, 60, 64, 65, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74
– Tanzania 13, 14, 16, 17, 32, 66, 68, 69
– Vodacom Business 14, 32, 68
Vodafone
Africa, Middle East, and Asia Pacific Region (AMAP) 6, 9, 10, 14, 57
Africa 9, 14, 57, 64, 68, 69, 70, 73
– – Asia 25
– – Australia 58, 59, 66
VHA Pty. Ltd (see Hutchison Whampoa) 19, 58, 59
Egypt 10, 14, 32, 59
– – Ghana 14, 64, 66
– – India 6, 8, 9, 10, 14, 25, 32, 54, 60, 66, 69
Indus Towers 25, 32, 66
Kenya (see Safaricom) 10, 14, 17, 63, 64, 68, 69
– – Mozambique 14
– – New Zealand 14, 33, 37, 61, 63
– – Pacific 25
– – Qatar (see Vodafone and Qatar Foundation and Vodafone Qatar) 14, 33, 62, 66
– – South Africa (see Vodacom) 4, 10, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 32, 60, 63, 64, 65, 66, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74
– – Turkey 10, 21, 33, 43, 60, 63, 64, 65, 66
Board of Directors
Davis, Sir Crispin 32
– – Kleisterlee, Gerard 7, 17, 52
– – Land, Nick 17
Europe Region 9, 10, 19, 35, 48
Cable & Wireless Worldwide 48
– – Czech Republic 43, 48
– – Germany 4, 6, 10, 15, 19, 20, 22, 27, 31, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 48, 50, 61, 66
KDG Holding GmbH (Kabel Deutschland) 37, 39, 44, 48
Greece 10, 21, 48, 66
Hellas On Line (HOL) 48
– – – Victus Networks 66
Hungary 21, 48
– – Ireland 4, 20, 43, 48, 54, 55, 66
Complete Telecom 48
– – – Netshare Ireland 66
– – – SIRO 48
Italy 4, 6, 10, 21, 40, 43, 44, 48, 50, 55, 66
– – Netherlands 6, 9, 22, 40, 41, 43, 48, 50, 54, 60, 66
VodafoneZiggo 6, 8, 9, 40, 41, 50
– – – Wiericke 48
Portugal 10, 43, 48, 50, 66
– – Romania 10, 21, 48, 66
– – Spain 6, 10, 19, 21, 37, 40, 44, 45, 47, 48, 49, 50, 66
Grupo Corporativo Ono (ONO) 45, 48
UK 4, 6, 10, 14, 17, 20, 22, 24, 25, 28, 29, 33, 40, 42, 43, 44, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 64, 66
Cornerstone Telecommunications Infrastructure Ltd 49, 66
– – – Talkmobile 51, 52
Executives
Ametsreiter, Hannes 36
– – Becker-Pennrich, Peter 32
– – Berroeta, Inaki 58
– – Berry, Brad 32
– – Brenneis, Erik 19
– – Coimbra, António 45
– – Colao, Vittorio 6, 15, 21, 22, 24, 40, 50, 55
– – Davies, Andrew 33
– – Geldmacher, Jan 32
– – Goschen, Brett 33
– – Gray, Ian 62
– – Heeran, Fran 33
– – Jeffery, Nick 51, 54
– – Joosub, Shameel 69, 71, 73
– – Mathur, Vivek 15, 32
– – Nair, Kavita 32
– – Read, Nick 9, 51, 63, 71
– – Rook, Ivo 19
– – Sahin, Meltem 33
– – Sharma, Balesh 32
– – Sinha, Pryanka 32
– – Sood, Sunil 32
– – Stefano Parisse 24
– – Terry-Brown, Peter 32
– – Timuray, Serpil 54, 55
– – van Essen, Ellen 32
– – Walters, Steve 33
– – Wibergh, Johan 27, 37
Ex-executives
Amzallag, David 33
– – Bybjerg, Kim 33
– – Ghosh, Sohini 33
– – Horn-Smith, Julian 33
– – Laurence, Guy 32, 33
– – Midgen, Andrea 33
– – Moors, Simone 33
– – Morrow, Bill 58
Group 8, 9, 18, 19, 25, 32, 52
Americas (see Verizon Wireless) 32
– – Commercial
Invitation Digital 20
Marketing
Vodafone Lab (Italy) 55
– – – Vodafone Warriors (New Zealand) 61
Partner Markets 14
Africa (Afrimax) 14
– – – Kenya (Safaricom) 10, 14, 17, 63, 64, 68, 69
– – – Switzerland (Swisscom) 19
R&D 18
– – Strategy
Total Communications 17, 64
Vodafone Automotive (formerly Cobra Automotive Technologies) 24
– – Vodafone Global Enterprise (VGE) 18, 19, 25, 32
– – Vodafone Procurement Company (VPC) 19
Tomorrow Street 19
Vodafone Ventures 18, 20
Affirmed Networks (see separate) 20
– – – Argyle Data (see separate) 20
– – – Caringo (see separate) 20
– – – CellEra (see separate) 20
– – – Cognia (see separate) 20
– – – Device Insight (see separate) 20, 21
– – – Finsphere (see separate) 20
– – – Flybits (see separate) 18, 19, 20
– – – Headwater Partners (see separate) 20
– – – ItsOn (see separate) 20
– – – Key Revolution Ltd, The (now liquidated) 20
– – – mimik technology (see separate) 20
– – – Naratte (see separate) 20
– – – OBS Medical (see separate) 20
– – – Perfecto Mobile (see separate) 19, 20
– – – Pontis (see separate) 19, 20
– – – Qualia Media (see separate) 20
– – – Quixey (see separate) 20
– – – Skorpios Technologies (see separate) 20
– – – Taqua (see separate) 20
– – – Top Optimized Technologies (see separate) 20
– – – United Hubbing Ltd (now liquidated) 20
– – – Vasona Networks (see separate) 20
– – – VOSS (see separate) 20
xone 24
Investments & Associates
Americas (see Verizon Wireless) 7, 19
Products
Business 60
– – Europe 40, 50
– – Liberty (Malta) 4, 33, 36, 47, 48, 49
– – MachineLink 3G
call plus 43
My Vodafone 53, 54
– – Red 22, 63
– – Terminals
541 10
Vodafone Cloud 60
– – Vodafone TV 44
Project Spring 36
Vodafone Qatar Q.S.C. 14, 33, 62, 66

W

Weather Investments
Orascom Telecom
Wind Telecomunicazioni 44
WPP 52
Ogilvy & Mather 52

Y

Yelp 19, 20
Qype 20

About

About Vodafonewatch

Report: #158
Covering: September 2017
Published: September 2017
Next report: October 2017
For more information visit: Vodafonewatch