An increased focus on customer experience (CX) emerged from within Vodafone’s Group Enterprise division, as the operator seeks to protect an enterprise sales stream that is now back in growth (rising 2.1%, to £10bn, during April 2015-March 2016/FY15-16), and contributing an expanding slice (28%) of Group service revenue.

Vodafone’s latest, FY15-16 Annual Report again highlighted the loss of or disruption to major business-to-business (B2B) contracts as a key Group risk, and flagged that during the financial year, the Group had kicked off a two-year “investment plan” focused on digitising enterprise service operations, and “lifting our enterprise customer experience into a market leadership position”. This came alongside a recent Board of Directors review of changes at Group Enterprise designed to “improve service and delivery to customers”.

Relatedly, in May 2016, Group Chief Technology Officer Johan Wibergh had flagged plans to introduce virtual customer premises equipment for business customers in his Gigabit Vodafone IT and network plans to 2020, saying the technology will “enable us to do rapid deployment to enterprises for new services at very cost-attractive cost points” (Vodafonewatch, #144).

B2B “visibility and control” a key issue

In a nod to the huge difficulties operators have experienced in attempting to grow their B2B partner and customer relationships, the Annual Report went on to note the challenges of “successful and profitable” delivery of major enterprise engagements, which are “dependent on complex technologies deployed across multiple geographies, as well as relative stability in the requirements, strategies, and businesses of our customers”.

<p>“ Our Group Enterprise customer operations are now consolidated within one function, aligned to industry best practice which will deliver a standard service model to our customers. We have implemented a single process across Group Enterprise that ensures alignment, visibility, and control across the entire customer experience, from sales governance and commercial risk through to service delivery, billing, and in-life operations. This is supported by global standardised ‘ways of working’ frameworks. ” – Vodafone.

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xMatters taps into VGE service improvement push

Also tied in with the CX improvement push was an announcement by xMatters, a California, US-based enterprise collaboration specialist, that it has secured an engagement with Vodafone Global Enterprise (VGE) to further the multinational corporate unit’s recent quality-of-service improvement push.

VGE was briefly highlighted in a June 2016 xMatters results announcement as one of 100 new clients secured by the provider during its latest fiscal year, and to now be using the xMatters platform to more rapidly resolve service problems. David Jeal, Head of VGE IT Engagement and Portfolios at Vodafone, was quoted by the vendor as saying implementing its offering has resulted in “faster resolution time and more proactive communication, leading to higher service satisfaction”.

VGE’s deployment of the xMatters solution looks to have come as part of a broader “service excellence” programme within Vodafone’s service management functions, focused on improvements and enhancements to the operator’s traditional use of BMC Software’s Remedy applications for trouble-ticketing. In 2014, Vodafone said a series of “smart next-generation social and collaboration tools” had been implemented for its incident resolution team, although few further details were made available (Vodafonewatch, #128).

According to an xMatters case study recently added to its website, Vodafone’s “major incident processes” were previously “not always up to the task”, with incident resolution staff often finding themselves “taking manual steps like copying incident information from Remedy and pasting it into emails or SMS messages”, introducing the potential for error or “security issues”. Vodafone is also said to have “occasionally failed targets to inform customers on time about service outages”, and not been able to reach the “right target audience” in “complex scenarios”.

However, the case study went on to add that incident communications are now faster and more efficient. It noted, for example, that the implementation of the xMatters platform saw “closed-loop integration with Remedy” so that when a staffer flags a major incident, a notification ticket is “automatically created from Remedy” and pulled into its solution, with recipients sent the “specific details required”. As well as internal users, “some 4, 500 business clients now receive proactive alerts and updates during incidents, reinforcing a culture of transparency and dramatically increasing customer satisfaction”, said xMatters.

Vodafone – now evidently one of xMatters’ showcase clients – sent a speaker to the vendor’s annual user conference in September 2015 to highlight the project.

Image: Franklin Hunting/Flickr.com

 

About

About Vodafonewatch

Report: #145
Covering: June 2016
Published: July 2016
Next report: July 2016
For more information visit: Vodafonewatch

Table of Contents

3 Executive brief
5 Group
6 Strategy
7 People
10 Group Commercial
10 M&A
17 Technology
20 Supply chain
22 Europe
23 Germany
27 Ireland
28 Italy
28 Netherlands
30 UK
33 Africa, Middle East, and Asia-Pacific Region
34 Australia — Vodafone Hutchison Australia
35 Egypt
36 India
37 Kenya — Safaricom
38 Turkey
40 Vodacom — South Africa
42 Vodacom — Tanzania
44 Further reading
47

Index

Symbols

3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) 17, 18, 20

A

Accenture 12
Aditya Birla Group
– Idea Cellular 38
Africa 12, 15, 33, 37, 38, 40, 41, 42
– Egypt 7, 12, 35, 36
– Ghana 12
– Kenya 7, 12, 37, 38
– – Government 37
– Nigeria 42
– South Africa 12, 40, 41, 42
– – Competition Commission 36
– Sub-Sahara 15
– Tanzania 37, 42
– – Tanzania Communications Regulatory Authority (TCRA) 42
– Uganda 15
– Zambia 15
Afrimax Group 15
Alcatel-Lucent 12
Altice Group 12
Amazon.com Inc. 36
– Amazon Web Services 36
Americas
– Canada 25, 27, 36, 40
– – Export Development Canada 27
– USA 7, 36
– – States
– – – Califormia 11, 16
– – – Ohio 23
Asia-Pacific 33
– Australia 34
– China 19
– Hong Kong 11
– India 7, 12, 15, 36, 37, 38
– – Cellular Operators Association of India (COAI) 38
– – Licence Circles
– – – Chennai 37
– – – Delhi 38
– – – Gujarat 37
– – – Mumbai 37, 38
– – Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) 36, 37, 38
– New Zealand 20, 23
AT&T 18
Aviva plc 27
Axiata Group Bhd (TM International)
– India (Idea Cellular, see also Aditya Birla) 38
– Sri Lanka (Dialog Telekom PLC, see separate) 12

B

Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd (BSNL) 37
Bharti Group 37
– Airtel 37
BMC Software 16
BroadSoft 20
BT Group 6

C

Carnegie Mellon University 29
Charles Schwab 12
Cisco Systems 12

D

Deutsche Telekom 11, 18, 24, 29
– Europe
– – UK (EE) 31
– Germany 23, 24, 25
– Investments
– – OTE (see separate) 11, 29
Digicel 28
du (Emirates Integrated Telecommunications) 10

E

eBay
– PayPal 28
Econet Wireless Group 40
EDF 11
– EDF Energy 11
EE (see DT, FT) 31
Ekso Bionics 11
Electricity Supply Board (Ireland) 23
Elliott Management Corporation 25
EMC 34
Emirates Airlines 10
Ericsson 18, 20, 28, 29, 30, 31
Etisalat 18, 36
– Etisalat Misr (Egypt) 36
Europe 6, 12, 17, 20, 22, 35
– Czech Republic 31
– France 11, 12
– – Legal 35
– Germany 12, 20, 23, 24, 25, 28, 29
– – Länder
– – – Bavaria (Munich) 23, 25
– – – Hamburg 23
– – – Saarland (Saarbrücken) 23
– – – Saxony (Dresden) 29
– Greece 10, 11, 31
– Hungary 7, 12, 28
– Ireland 12, 20, 23, 27
– Italy 7, 28
– Luxembourg 7
– Malta 10
– Netherlands 7, 8, 12, 15, 17, 28, 29, 30
– Romania 7, 12
– Scotland 31
– Spain 7, 19, 25, 28
– Sweden 12
– Turkey 19, 38
– United Kingdom (UK) 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 18, 19, 20, 27, 28, 30, 31, 37
– – Office of Communications (Ofcom) 30
European Union 6, 8, 29
– European Commission 18, 24, 28

F

Foreign Investment Promotion Board (FIPB 37
Forthnet 10, 11

G

GCI 10
– Commsxchange 10
– Outsourcery 10
GoDaddy 34
Google 34
– Google Apps 34
GSM Association (GSMA) 18
– Mobile World Congress 24

H

Helios Investment Partners 37
– Helios Towers Africa, Ltd. 37
Huawei Technologies 17, 18, 19, 20, 28, 29, 30, 31
Hutchison Whampoa 34
– Vodafone Hutchison Australia Pty Ltd (VHA, (see Vodafone) 34

I

IDC 17
Iliad 28
Independent Board Evaluation 7
InfraCo Management Services 40
Intel 18, 29
Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU) 27

J

JCDecaux Group 30

K

KPN 28

L

Largo Ltd
– WIND Hellas 10
Liberty Global Inc. 23
Lite Access Technologies 40

M

Mahanagar Telephone Nigam Ltd (MTNL) 37
Mannesmann 25
Mariner Partners 27
– Mariner xVu 27
Market segments
– Contactless payment (NFC) 28
– Network-sharing 10
– Outsourcing 37
– Over-the-top (OTT) 12
– Small- to medium-size enterprise (SME/SMB) 34
– Voice 27, 29, 38
MasterCard 28
Microsoft 12, 34
– Office 365 34
Middle East 10, 33
– Egypt 7, 12, 35, 36
– Qatar 12, 31
– United Arab Emirates 10
Mobinil 35
MTN 12, 15

N

NASDAQ 14
Neotel (Pty) Ltd (SNO Telecommunications, see also Reliance) 40, 41
Netflix Inc. 27
Next Generation Mobile Network Initiative 29
Next Generation Mobile Networks 29
Nokia 12, 18, 29, 30, 42
Nokia Solutions & Networks 42
Numéricable 12
NXT 41

O

Ooredoo 27
Orange
– Egypt (Mobinil) 35
– Kenya (Telkom Kenya, see separate) 37
– Orange 18, 29, 35, 36, 37
– UK (see EE) 31
OTE (Hellenic Telecom. Org. SA, see DT) 11, 29

P

Philips 7, 30

Q

Qualcomm 18, 29, 31

R

RAI 38
Remedy 16
Rogers Communications 27
Rohde & Schwarz 29
Royal Bafokeng Holdings (RBH) 40

S

Safaricom 12, 37, 38
– Executives
– – Collymore, Bob 38
– M-PESA 38, 42
Siemens 42
Sigma Systems Canada 25
Swisscom 28
– Fastweb 28
Symantec 34

T

TalkTalk Telecom Group plc 6
Tangoe 14
Tata Group 40
– Tata Communications 40
– – Neotel (see separate listing) 40, 41
Technische Universitat Dresden 29
Technology
– 2G 18
– – EDGE 18
– – GPRS 18
– – GSM 18, 19, 38
– 3G 29, 42
– 4G 15, 17, 29, 30, 31, 35, 36, 42
– – Long Term Evolution (LTE) 15, 17, 18, 19, 27, 42
– – – LTE TDD 15
– 5G 28, 29, 31
– Cloud computing 10, 12, 29, 34, 36
– Data centre 11
– DSL 23, 24
– e-Machine-Type Communications (eMTC/LTE-M) 18
– Extended Coverage GSM (EC-GSM) 18
– Fibre 23, 24, 30, 37, 40, 41, 42
– – FTTP 24
– FTTH 40, 41
– GPRS 18
– IP 27, 37
– M2M 17, 36
– Narrow Band Internet of Things (NB-IoT) 17, 18, 19, 20
– OSS 25
– R&D 17, 18, 29
– SIM 11
– Smartphone 36
– SMS 16, 30
– Spectrum 17, 18, 19, 20, 28, 31, 40, 42
– – 800 MHz 31
– – 900 MHz 18, 19, 42
– – 1000 MHz 42
– – 1800 MHz 31, 42
– – 2100 MHz 42
– – 2600 MHz 31
– – 3500 MHz 42
– VDSL 23
– W-LAN 7, 38
Telecom Egypt 35
Telecom Italia 18
Telefónica Group 18, 27, 29, 31
– Europe
– – UK 31
Telkom Kenya Ltd (Orange Kenya) 37
Telstra 18

U

u-blox 19
Usaha Tegas Group Holdings Bhd
– Maxis Communication, Malaysia
– – Aircel 38

V

Verizon Communications 18
– Verizon Wireless 18
Visa 28
Vivendi
– SFR (Société Française de Radiotéléphone) 12
Vodacom Group 12, 15, 31, 37, 40, 41, 42
– Group 12, 15, 31, 40, 41, 42
– Products
– – Please Call Me 41
– South Africa 12, 40, 41, 42
– Tanzania 37, 42
– Vodacom Business 15
– – AfriConnect Zambia Ltd 15
Vodafone
– Africa, Middle East, and Asia Pacific Region (AMAP) 33
– – Africa 12, 15, 33, 37, 38, 40, 41, 42
– – Asia 33
– – Australia 34
– – – VHA Pty. Ltd (see Hutchison Whampoa) 34
– – Egypt 7, 12, 35, 36
– – Ghana 12
– – India 7, 12, 15, 36, 37, 38
– – Kenya (see Safaricom) 7, 12, 37, 38
– – Middle East 33
– – New Zealand 20, 23
– – Pacific 33
– – Qatar (see Vodafone and Qatar Foundation and Vodafone Qatar) 12, 31
– – South Africa (see Vodacom) 12, 15, 31, 37, 40, 41, 42
– – Turkey 19, 38
– Board of Directors
– – Davis, Sir Crispin 7
– – Kleisterlee, Gerard 7, 30
– Corporate
– – Vodafone International Holdings BV 35
– – Vodafone Procurement Company S.a.r.l 7
– Europe Region 12
– – Cable & Wireless Worldwide 11
– – Czech Republic 31
– – Germany 12, 20, 23, 24, 25, 28, 29
– – – KDG Holding GmbH (Kabel Deutschland) 23, 24, 25
– – Greece 10, 11, 31
– – – Hellas On Line (HOL) 11
– – Hungary 7, 12, 28
– – Ireland 12, 20, 23, 27
– – Italy 7, 28
– – Malta 10
– – Netherlands 8, 12, 17, 28, 29, 30
– – Romania 7, 12
– – Spain 7, 19, 25, 28
– – – Grupo Corporativo Ono (ONO) 7, 23, 25
– – UK 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 18, 19, 20, 27, 28, 30, 31, 37
– Executives
– – Albertyn, Eben 29
– – Beal, Matthew 20
– – Bertoluzzo, Paolo 12
– – Bhettay, Nadya 12
– – Brenneis, Erik 12, 17
– – Colao, Vittorio 7, 8, 10, 24, 25
– – Connors, John 7
– – Essam, Ahmed 12
– – Gastaut, Stefano 12
– – Geldmacher, Jan 12
– – Hoencamp, Jeroen 31
– – Ibbetson, Luke 17, 18, 29
– – Jeffery, Nick 12
– – O’Leary, Anne 27
– – Read, Nick 7, 41
– – Schay, Daniel 12
– – Shuter, Rob 12
– – Tombleson, John 12
– – Wibergh, Johan 7, 15, 17
– – Zoleka Cuba, Yolanda 12
– Ex-executives
– – Combes, Michel 12
– – Healy, Donagh 12
– – Humm, Philipp 12
– – Laurence, Guy 27
– – Matei, Gabriela 12
– – Motsa, Godfrey 12
– – Pusey, Stephen 7
– – Sarin, Arun 12
– Group 12, 14, 16, 17, 18, 20, 24, 35
– – Headquarters 7, 17, 18, 20
– – Mannesmann 25
– – Partner Markets 10, 12, 15
– – – Africa (Afrimax) 15
– – – France (SFR/Vivendi) 12
– – – Kenya (Safaricom) 12, 37, 38
– – – Sri Lanka (Dialog Axiata) 12
– – – Switzerland (Swisscom) 28
– – – United Arab Emirates (du) 10
– – R&D 17, 18, 29
– – Vodafone Global Enterprise (VGE) 12, 14, 16, 17
– – – Quickcomm 14
– – – TnT Expense Management 14
– – Vodafone Procurement Company (VPC) 7
– Investments & Associates
– – Americas (see Verizon Wireless) 18
– Products
– – Call Me 41
– – Europe 12, 35
– – International (UK) 35
– – Liberty (Malta) 23
– – M2M 17
– – One Net 20
– – Please Call Me 41
– – Red 38
– – Select Video 23
– – Small Business (UK) 34
– – Vodafone TV 27
– Project Spring 8, 30, 41
Vodafone Qatar Q.S.C. 12, 31

W

Weather Investments
– Orascom Telecom
– – Mobinil (see Orange) 35
WorldxChange Communications Ltd 20

X

Xero 34
xMatters 16

Z

Zain (MTC) 18
Zesko Holding BV
– Ziggo 8, 12