Data Center

  • Telefónica España added software-defined data centres (SDDC) to its SD-WAN partnership with Nokia and its Nuage Networks unit, with the aim of simplifying customer access to cloud-based applications.

Telefónica is now extending its software-defined wide area network (SD-WAN) infrastructure to include SDDCs, based on Nuage’s virtualised cloud services (VCS) solution – the data centre and cloud-networking framework of Nuage’s virtualised services platform (VSP) – and Nokia and Nuage routers.

The Spanish telco plans to build an “open, elastic, and highly secure” data centre network infrastructure, with the aim of offering enterprises the ability to “order, customise, and configure value-added services through a self-service portal for on-demand delivery”.
The VCS solution is said to enable Telefónica to accelerate the provisioning of application and network services for customers with “cloud-scale efficiency.”

The new capabilities mean it will be possible to automatically establish networking configurations with quality-of-service and security policies, and follow a “zero-touch, policy-based” approach to network automation of applications running on any infrastructure, whether containers, servers, or virtual machines.

Nuage added that the service will enable hybrid-cloud seamless interconnection between private data centres, Telefónica SDDCs, and public clouds, and manage customer demand for cloud-based applications across their operations.

  • The Spanish Telefónica unit tied with Nokia-owned Nuage Network in May 2017, to enable it to provide SD-WAN services to enterprise customers based on Nuage’s virtualised network services (Telefónicawatch, #117). In June 2017, the telco launched its SD-WAN solution, branded flexWAN, with an initial focus on enterprise customers in Spain, and deployment in other Group markets expected later in 2017 (Telefónicawatch, #118).
  • An SDDC is a data centre in which all the infrastructure is virtualised and delivered ‘as-a-service’, thus offering greater agility, flexibility, and scale for enterprise customers. In 2015, Gartner predicted that, by 2020, the programmatic capabilities of an SDDC would be considered a requirement for 75% of the 2,000 largest public enterprises (the so-called Global 2000) that implement a DevOps approach – a software engineering culture and practice that aims to unify software development (Dev) and software operation (Ops) – and a hybrid cloud model. Speaking to Network World in 2016, Sunil Khandekar, Chief Executive and founder of Nuage Networks, said an enterprise cannot have an SDDC without SD-WAN, if it wants to ensure a consistent policy across its IT infrastructure.

Key points of the extended deal and deployment:

  • The VCS solution is said to be OpenStack-compliant and fully certified with the Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack platform. Worth noting here is that Telefónica’s “cloud-nativeUNICA platform is built on OpenStack, which it envisages enabling faster and more flexible delivery of services to end users.
  • The VCS solution is said to enable Telefónica to automate the configuration, management, and optimisation of virtual networks in the data centre, including bandwidth, quality-of-service policy, and security services.
  • Telefónica will be able to deliver SD-WAN and SDDC services using Nuage’s single common networks VSP, which in turn is said to pave the way for a “massively multi-tenant, fully automated, and highly secure SDN [software-defined network] infrastructure that spans the data centre, the branch, and the cloud”. Multi-tenancy is an architecture in which a single instance of a software application serves multiple customers.
  • Telefónica’s leaf-spine data centre architecture (described as a specialised topology that minimises latency and bottlenecks) for the SDDC solution is supported by Nokia 7750-SR-1 routers. These are powered by: 2.4Tbps network processor FP4; Nokia 7250 IXR-10 routers as super-spine nodes to support 100Gbps Ethernet (100GbE) connectivity; and Nuage 210 WBX data centre leaf routers for 1GbE, 10GbE, 25GbE, 40GbE, 50GbE, and 100GbE interfaces.

“To meet the rapidly emerging business requirements for agility and on-demand deployments, we moved aggressively to build our business connectivity services around a new cloud-based architecture. Nuage Networks provided us with a highly scalable SDN architecture that could support all our services across all our regions without disruption. We are confident our customers will significantly improve their businesses with these new cloud-based services.” – Joaquín Mata, Director of Operations, Network and IT, Telefónica España.

Telefónica first showcased flexWAN, alongside flexUser and Multicloud services, as new elements of its Living Cloud strategy in summer 2016, targeted at large enterprise customers and designed to ease the process of migrating company functions to the cloud (Telefónicawatch, #108).

  • As well as Nuage Networks, other vendors providing SD‑WAN capabilities include Aryaka, Cisco Systems, CloudGenix, Juniper Networks, Mushroom Networks, Riverbed, Silver Peak, TELoIP, VeloCloud Networks, and Versa Networks. Vendors that provide SDDC solutions and capabilities include Cisco, Microsoft (Azure Stack), NEC Corporation, Nutanix, Red Hat, Stratoscale, and VMware.
  • In a June 2017 interview with Netmanias, Gary Kinghorn, Senior Product Marketing Manager at Nuage Networks, claimed that the vendor’s SD-WAN solution had proven attractive to operators like Telefónica, and pointed out that SD-WAN is complementary to, rather than a replacement for, multiprotocol label switching (MPLS), and can help reduce MPLS-related costs. Meanwhile, Johan Witters, IP Regional Product Line Manager at Nokia with responsibility for SD-WAN development in Europe, Middle East, and Africa, reportedly claimed that “all major [service providers]” in Europe now have an SD-WAN solution tightly integrated with their other systems, and cited Telefónica and BT (Cisco-aligned, as well as Nuage) as two such operators, with “many potential deals in their pipelines”.

Image: Commscope / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Contents

EXECUTIVE BRIEF

GROUP

Management up-date

Álvarez-Pallete hails his technology company [p.6]

  • Designing the future

People

GLOBAL RESOURCES

Partners

Suppliers

Interview: CCS’s Greaves on working with Telefónica [p.11]

  • Building a Telefónica relationship
  • Today Madrid, tomorrow the world?
  • Hardware making things possible for small vendors and big operators

CCS interview [p.11]

  • Trials of TIP for small vendors
  • CCS on the O2/CTIL London wireless network [p.15]
  • CCS background

Telefónica Business Solutions

Telefónica trumpets strategic alliance with AWS [p.16]

  • AWS takes its place beside Azure

Telxius teams with Equinix [p.17]

TIWS reaches another level of automation [p.18]

  • Automation of operations complete
  • Next step: all-IP voice

Virtualisation 

Telefónica builds on SD-WAN ambitions with Nokia and Nuage [p.20]

UNICA Lab waves in NETSCOUT, RADCOM VNFs [p.22]

  • NETSCOUT gets in early with virtualisation visibility
  • OSM key to Telefónica collaboration
  • Rival RADCOM also in on the act

More potential assurance partners circling [p.23]

Digital services

Blockchain

  • Telefónica and Rivetz re-up relationship  [p.25]
  • Telefónica joins up for inter-carrier blockchain testing

Open Future

Content

Telefónica adds Netflix to content offer

  • Spirit of co-opetition lives on
  • Part of a wider content strategy
  • Álvarez-Pallete and Hastings get pally on Twitter

Netflix already big in Spain [p.28]

Security

Telefónica claims quantum leap in encryption technology

Valencia named as cybersecurity HQ [p.30]

LATIN AMERICA

Argentina

Ericsson to upgrade Movistar RAN network in Argentina [p.33]

  • Ericsson progress presented as a win against Huawei

Brazil

  • Ericsson and Telefónica team on farm 4G IoT [p.35 ]
  • Netcracker maintains its hold within Vivo [p.36]

Colombia

Ecuador

Mexico

EUROPE

Germany

Álvarez-Pallete underlines commitment to Germany [38]

  • E-Plus integration taking longer than anticipated
  • Group offers muscle, but won’t influence decisions

Telefónica wary of Vodafone acquisition plans [p.39]

Spain

Ola, O2 [p.41]

  • Personalised service – at a respectful distance
  • Telefónica upfront on regulatory disparity
  • Serrahima makes a splash with O2 pick
  • British and German feathers ruffled?

Telefónica accelerates copper closures [p.43]

Telefónica brings Google into Living Cloud [p.44]

Movistar VeriSure Hogar closes down [p.45]

UK

Arqiva backs O2 small-cell rollout [p.46]

Beacon light begins to fade

O2 gets Netflix [p.47]

Further reading

INDEX

Index

Symbols

21st Century Fox

Sky plc 7, 28

A

Acision 8

ADVA Optical Networking 29

AI 33

Alcatel-Lucent 15

Alphabet

  — Google 33, 44

  — G Suite 44

Altran 23

Amazon 16, 22, 28, 44

  — Amazon Web Services 16, 22, 44

Arqiva 46

B

BT Group 14, 21, 25, 29

C

Cambridge Broadband 15

CCS 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 46

Cisco Systems, Inc 21

CNMC 28, 42

Cobham Wireless 23

Colt Group 25

Conectel 36

ContentWise 27

D

Dell Technologies

  — VMware 17, 21, 22

Deloitte 7, 8

Deutsche Telekom 7, 15, 38

E

Equinix 17

Ericsson 8, 12, 13, 23, 27, 33, 34, 35, 43

European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) 18, 22

F

Facebook 15, 17, 33

  — Telecom Infra Project 15

  — WhatsApp 35

G

Gartner Group 20

General Electric 7

Groupon 7

GSM Association (GSMA)

Mobile World Congress 23, 33

H

HBO 28

Huawei 8, 23, 29, 34, 45

I

Ingram Micro 11

J

Juniper Networks 21

L

Luxoft Holding 23

M

MásMóvil 41, 42

  — Yoigo (Xfera) 41

Microsoft 11, 16, 17, 21, 22, 33, 44

Azure 11, 16, 22, 44

N

NEC 21, 36

  — Netcracker 36

NET 22, 23

Netflix 26, 27, 28, 47

NETSCOUT 22, 23

Nokia 12, 20, 21, 43

Nuage Networks 20, 21

O

Orange 28, 43

Spain 28, 43

P

PCCW 25

R

RADCOM 22, 23

Raízen 35

Red Hat 21, 23

Regions

  — EMEA

    — Belgium 44

    — Europe 7, 21, 22, 26, 37, 42, 43, 44, 47

     — Finland 44

     — Germany 7, 38, 39, 42, 45

     — Israel 23

     — Netherlands 22, 44

    — Spain 7, 16, 17, 20, 26, 27, 28, 30, 33, 38, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47

     — UK 7, 8, 11, 12, 14, 29, 33, 45, 46

  — Latin America 15, 23, 26, 27, 32, 34, 35, 38, 45, 47

     — Argentina 33, 34, 38

     — Brazil 7, 8, 17, 33, 35, 36, 38, 42

     — Chile 26, 35

     — Colombia 34

    — Ecuador 35, 36

    — Mexico 7, 36

    — Peru 36

  — North America

    — USA 17

Rivetz 25

Royal KPN 38

RTVE 27

S

Samsung 13

Securitas Direct 45

Siemens 7

Sigfox 45

Symantec 11

T

Technologies

  — 3G 13

  — 3.5G 43

  — 4G

  — LTE 12, 13, 35, 45, 46

  — 5G 11, 13, 14, 33, 38, 43, 46

  — ADSL 43

  — Blockchain 25

  — Broadband 15, 28, 33, 41, 45

  — Business/Operations Support Systems (BSS/OSS) 33, 36

  — Cloud computing 44

  — Ethernet 13, 18, 21

  — GSM 13

  — ICT 8

  — Internet of Things 16, 26, 30, 33

  — IP 13, 15, 18, 21

  — IPTV 27

  — Linux 21

  — LPWA 45

  — MIMO 14

  — MPLS 21

  — NB-IoT 45

  — Network functions virtualisation (NFV) 17, 22, 23, 29

  — NGN 13, 38

  — OpenStack 17, 21, 22

  — PaaS (Platform as a Service) 16

  — SIM 16, 25, 41, 47

  — SMS 35

  — Software defined networking (SDN) 18, 21, 29

  — TV 26, 27, 28

  — VDSL 13

  — WLAN

  — Wi-Fi 11, 12

Telefónica Group 6, 7, 8, 11, 17, 25, 26, 27, 38, 39, 45, 47

  — Associates and investments

    — Sigfox 45

    — Digital services

     — AURA 33, 45

    — ElevenPaths 8, 16, 25, 30

    — Open Future 7, 26, 35

    — OTT 26, 27

    — Tuenti 42

    — Wayra 7, 26, 35

  — Directors

    — Cirac, Ignacio 29

    — Löscher, Peter 7

  — Europe

    — E-Plus 38

    — Germany 7, 38, 39, 42

    — giffgaff 8

    — O2 7, 8, 11, 12, 13, 14, 33, 38, 39, 41, 42, 45, 46, 47

    — Spain 7, 20, 21, 42, 43, 44, 45

    — Telefónica Deutschland 7, 36, 39

    — UK 7, 8, 11, 12, 13, 14, 26, 42, 46, 47

  — Executives

    — Álvarez-Pallete Lopez, José María 6, 27, 28, 38, 39

    — Barahona, Claudio 26

    — Cantarelli, Stefano 8

    — Castillo Sanz, Eva 7

    — Devine, Amanda 7

    — Díaz Hernández, María 8

    — Dominguez, Jose Luis 8

    — Elizondo, Antonio 22

    — Franks, Robert 7

    — Garcia, Maria Luisa 7

    — Gomez, Santiago 7

    — Haas, Markus 39

    — Mata, Joaquin 21

    — Moratilla, Daniel 8

    — Naiksatam, Ashwin 8

    — Navarro, Eduardo 8, 35

    — Pavlovic, Natascha 7

    — Phillips, Tristan 7

    — Ponce de Leon, Marcela 7

    — Prado, Elisa 8

    — Rava, Federico 33

    — Rodríguez-Ramos, Jaime 7

    — Saadi, Miloud 7

    — Seitz, Alexander 7

    — Serrahima, Pedro 42

    — Wood, Alison 8

    — Zunzunegui, Adrian 7

  — Global Resources

    — BRUSA 17

      — Cornerstone Telecommunications Infrastructure 11, 46

      — MAREA 17

    — Telefónica Business Solutions 8, 16, 36

    — Telefónica Global Services 7

    — Telefónica International Wholesale Services 18

    — Telxius 8, 17, 45

    — UNICA 21, 22, 23

  — Latin America

    — Brazil 8, 33, 35, 36, 42

    — Colombia 34

    — Mexico 7, 36

    — Vivo 8, 33, 36, 41, 42

  – Movistar+ 26, 28, 33

  – Products and services

    — Fusión 45

    — Living Cloud 21, 44

    — Movistar+ 26, 28, 33

    — Movistar Play 26

    — Movistar Series 27

    — Movistar VeriSure Hogar 45

    — O2 Refresh 47

    — pay-TV 26, 27, 28, 33, 39, 47

    — Simplicity 41

Telstra 25

Tesco 8

Tuenti 42

Twitter 27, 28

U

United Nations 35

V

Verizon Communications 12, 22

  — Verizon Wireless 12

Viacom 27

Viavi 23

VMware 17, 21, 22

Vodafone Group 28, 39, 46

  — Germany 39

UK 46

W

We-Technologies 26

World Bank 34

X

Xura 8

Z

ZTE 12

About

About Telefónicawatch

Report: #127
Published: June 2018
Next report: July 2018
For more information visit: Telefónicawatch