O2 Germany put its money where its mouth is with the inclusion of a tranche of bonds solely using blockchain technology, as part of a EUR200m debt issue.

  • Some analysts criticised the operating business for a gimmicky launch at a time when financial and operational performance is under close scrutiny.

Telefónica Deutschland (O2 Germany) and two German banks, Landesbank Baden-Württemberg (LBBW) and DZ Bank AG, launched a promissory note loan with a target volume of EUR200m, using blockchain technology in combination with a traditional financing process. This was intended to promote the use of the digital technology to handle financial commitments.

While the issue is dominated by traditional promissory notes, LBBW is managing a regulatory-compliant note loan with a one-year term that uses blockchain throughout to manage secure financial transactions. The majority of the more conventional debt being placed is to have a term of seven to 15 years.

Telefónica trumpeted the technological and sectoral innovation that has enabled the mixed promissory note loan, claiming it marks a significant step towards the “development of more efficient and transparent processes in the German economy”.

Financial analysts snooty, but Telefónica remains committed

Not everyone was impressed by the move, however: Dow Jones reported that Bernstein analysts said a blockchain distraction is the last thing Telefónica Deutschland’s management needs, as it should be focusing on its problems with customer perception and “almost inevitable” losses in market share. The move is nevertheless a further demonstration of Telefónica Group’s interest in blockchain, which it has been exploring at a number of levels.

Telefónica Business Solutions recently partnered with Rivetz for a new breed of security solutions to authenticate different types of transactions including blockchain, while the Group filed an application with the US Patent and Trademark Office that suggests it is considering how blockchain technology can enhance data encryption and security (Telefónicawatch, #120).

Furthermore, Telefónica Open Future recently hosted a coding ‘hackathon‘ focused on blockchain technology (Telefónicawatch, #121). In October 2017, Telefónica, together with 70 other Spanish companies, also became a founding member of the Alastria consortium to develop blockchain in Spain.

According to an interview in February 2017 with Christoph Steck, Director of Public Policy & Internet at Telefónica, blockchain technology “is going to generate the greatest wave of innovation and disruption in the way we do business and provide services after the birth of the commercial internet 25 years ago.”

Image: Fré Sonneveld / Unsplash.

Table of Contents

EXECUTIVE BRIEF

GROUP

Management update

Gilpérez out as Álvarez-Pallete issues rallying cry [p6]

  • End of Gilpérez rein in Spain
  • Regional divisions return to Latin America
  • Corporate changes, and additional reshuffling
  • Álvarez-Pallete’s dream of tomorrow
  • Table 1: People movement highlights

Global Resources

Progress on 5G standards opens way to 2019 deployments

5G

Ericsson vs Nokia in Telefónica’s 5G city face-off [p11]

  • A local network for local people
  • Two traditional mobile partners given a shot…
  • …but still playing catch-up?

5TONIC undertakes new research projects [p13]

  • R&S unveiled as latest ‘collaborator’…
  • 5TONIC trumpets 5G trials for industrial robots…
  • 5TONIC follows through with wide remit

Partners

Telefónica takes Tutela agreement global [p15]

  • Tutela benchmarking doesn’t pull punches on Telefónica performance

Suppliers

Huawei and Telefónica trumpet SDN transport trials [p16]

  • New platform planned for WDM management
  • Another fine mesh

Supplier profile: Allot

Securing Telefónica’s trust [p18]

  • Allot a comfortable fit with Telefónica’s virtualised platform approach
  • BIOGRAPHY: EREZ ANTEBI
  • Global strategy, local solutions
  • Ereze Antebi: Allot and sector transformation [p20]
  • Allot’s USP
  • Making friends and influencing operators
  • Allot enthusiastic for new model opportunities
  • Breaking out of the capex vault
  • Operators providing principal customer focus
  • Today Spain, tomorrow the world…?
  • Virtualised reality
  • New IoT and video use-cases
  • … but no place like home
  • Operators’ integral role in securing a digital world

LATIN AMERICA

Regional

Telefónica deploys open source STB software from Wyplay [p26]

  • Wyplay makes its mark in a busy ecosystem
  • Vivo launches bundles to boost digital services in Brazil

Argentina

Regulator approves quad-play services for Movistar [p29]

Brazil

Vivo expands IPTV to 21 more cities [p30]

  • Vivo DTH exodus gathers momentum

Colombia

Ezentis wins new contract from Coltel [p32]

EUROPE

Germany

Telefónica gets on-trend with blockchain financing [p34]

  • Financial analysts snooty, but Telefónica remains committed

O2 Germany trumpets tie-up with online video store [p35]

O2 video still lags

Spain

Telefónica España wins F1 rights for three more years [p36]

UK

TalkTalk offers O2 deals to mobile subscribers [p37]

O2 Smart Home closes its doors [p38]

  • Failing fast, moving on
  • AT&T alliance goes out with a whimper
  • Other smart home projects continue

O2 signs mobile identity deal with Danal [p39]

FURTHER READING

INDEX

Index

Symbols

3GPP 11, 14
21st Century Fox
– Sky plc 35

A

Accenture 8
ADVA Optical Networking 17
Alastria 34
Alcatel-Lucent 35
Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise 35
Alphabet
– Google
– – Android 15
– – YouTube 29
América Móvil 27, 32
– Claro 15, 27, 29, 32
Apple
– iOS 15
Aquto 29
ARRIS 26
Artesyn Embedded Technologies 13
ASTI 13
AT&T 7, 27, 38, 39
– DirecTV 27

B

Bernstein 34
Bouygues Telecom 39
BT Group 8

C

CaixaBank 35
C&G IT Solutions 35
– Myfixpert 35
CIENA 17
Cisco Systems, Inc 8
CK Hutchison
– H3G
– – UK 37
Cohere Technologies 13, 14
CommScope 13
Coriant 17

D

Danal 39
DZ Bank 34

E

ENACOM 29
Ericsson 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 26, 27
European Union 15
Ezentis 32

F

Facebook 29

G

Gilat Satellite Networks Ltd 19
Google
– YouTube 22
GSM Association (GSMA) 39
– Mobile World Congress 39

H

Huawei 12, 14, 16, 17, 30, 39

I

ICE (Costa Rica) 32
IFEMA 13
IFT (Mexico) 32
Infinera 17
Intel 13
InterDigital 13

J

Juniper Networks 14, 17

K

Kudelski Group
– Nagra 27

L

LinkedIn 8

M

MaxLinear 14
McAfee 22
MVNOs 37

N

NEC 17
– Netcracker 17
Netflix 22, 29
Nokia 11, 12, 14, 16

O

Orange 8, 39

P

ProBrand International 14

Q

Quantenna 26
Quantenna Communications 26

R

Regions
– EMEA
– – Europe 6, 7, 11, 12, 15, 20, 33, 38, 39
– – France 26, 39
– – Germany 8, 34, 35
– – Ireland 8, 39
– – Israel 18, 19
– – Italy 14
– – Spain 6, 11, 12, 13, 16, 17, 18, 19, 27, 32, 34, 35, 36, 39
– – UK 8, 15, 37, 38, 39
– Latin America 6, 7, 15, 20, 25, 26, 27, 29, 30, 31, 32, 39
– – Argentina 7, 27, 29
– – Brazil 7, 14, 15, 21, 27, 29, 30
– – Central America 7
– – Chile 7, 27, 30
– – Colombia 7, 14, 15, 30, 32
– – Costa Rica 26, 31, 32
– – Ecuador 7
– – Guatemala 31
– – Mexico 15, 32
– – Nicaragua 31
– – Peru 7, 32
– – Uruguay 7
– – Venezuela 7
– North America
– – Canada 15
– – USA 19, 39
Rivetz 34
Rohde & Schwarz 13

S

Samsung 38
Securitas Direct 39
SIAE Microelettronica 14
Spotify 29
Subtel (Chile) 30
Sutel (Costa Rica) 31, 32

T

TalkTalk plc 37
Technologies
– 3G 37
– 4G
– – LTE 11, 12, 13, 27, 32, 35, 37
– – LTE-A 32, 35
– 5G 11, 12, 13, 14, 30
– Broadband 30, 36
– Cloud computing 30
– DTH 30, 31
– GSM 39
– high definition (HD) 31
– Internet of Things 20, 30
– IP 16, 35
– IPTV 26, 30, 31
– LPWA 30
– LTE-A Pro 32
– MIMO 12
– NB-IoT 30
– Network functions virtualisation (NFV) 22
– R&D 12, 19
– Smart City 12
– Smart metering 38
– Software defined networking (SDN) 16, 17
– Telematics 38
– TV 26, 27, 29, 31, 38
– WLAN
– – Wi-Fi 27, 37
Telecom Italia
– TIM Brasil 15
Telefónica Group 6, 8, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 21, 30, 32, 34, 35, 39
– Associates and investments
– – Quantenna 26
– – Sigfox 22, 39
– Digital services
– – AURA 38
– – ElevenPaths 22
– – Open Future 34
– – OTT 31
– – Quantenna Communications 26
– – Telefónica I+D 30
– – Wayra 8, 30, 35
– Europe 39
– – Germany 8, 34, 35
– – O2 8, 15, 34, 35, 37, 38, 39
– – Spain 6, 8, 11, 12, 16, 27, 35, 36
– – Telefónica Deutschland 17, 34, 35
– – UK 8, 37, 38, 39
Executives
– – Alierta, César 6
– – Alonso, Chema 19
– – Álvarez-Pallete Lopez, José María 6, 7
– – Bacic, Katrin 8
– – Blanco, Fabián 8
– – Caride, Eduardo 7
– – De Carvajal, Pablo 7
– – Garcia, Juan Carlos 15
– – Gayo, Emilio 6
– – Gebara, Christian 31
– – Gilpérez López, Luis Miguel 6, 11
– – Gómez, Alfonso 7
– – Gomez, Sergio 8
– – Gonzalez de Santiago 8
– – Hernández, Fabián 7
– – Horcajo, Alberto 7
– – Keates, Rob 8
– – Lopez Blanco, Carlos 7
– – Machicot, Marta 7
– – Martin, Mario 7
– – Mata, Joaquin 11
– – Navarro, Eduardo 7
– – Quinn, Bernardo 7
– – Sainz, Natalia 7
– – Sánchez de Lérin, Ramiro 7
– – Vilá, Ángel 7, 31
– Ex-executives
– – Rosen, Daniel 8
– Global Resources
– – 5TONIC 12, 13, 14
– – Telefónica Business Solutions 8, 34
– – Telefónica Ingeniería de Seguridad 8
– – Telxius 7
– Latin America
– – Argentina 27, 29
– – Brazil 26, 29, 30, 31
– – Chile 30
– – Mexico 15, 29
– – Vivo 15, 29, 30, 31
– Movistar+ 36
– Products and services
– – Fusión 6, 36
– – Movistar+ 36
– – Movistar Play 31
– – Movistar TV 26, 31
– – Movistar VeriSure Hogar 39
– – O2 Drive 38
– – O2 Home 38
– – O2 o 37, 38
– – O2 Priority 37
– – pay-TV 26, 27, 29, 31, 36
Tutela Technologies 15
Twitter 29

V

Verizon Communications 39
– Verizon Wireless 39
Videobuster.de 35
Vodafone Group 15, 35, 36, 37
– Germany 35
– Spain 36
– UK 37
Volkswagen Group
– SEAT 12

W

Wyplay 26, 27, 30, 31

Z

ZTE 12, 17

About

About Telefónicawatch

Report: #123
Published: January 2018
Next report: February 2018
For more information visit: Telefónicawatch