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Group Chief Executive Vittorio Colao confirmed the operator’s planned flotation of shares in Vodafone India (VfIn) has been pushed back, following the highly aggressive, 1 September 2016 entrance of newcomer Reliance Jio Infocomm (Vodafonewatch, #147).

Speaking at Goldman Sachs’ September 2016 Communacopia Conference in New York, Colao said Jio’s Welcome Offer of free, unlimited 4G data and voice until end-2016 had “complicated” the market picture in India. While emphasising his belief that VfIn can be “competitive” with Jio, he said the promotion will “make it very hard to really understand the numbers from both an outside [and an] inside point of view… Customers who can afford a 4G phone will take the offer, because why wouldn’t you?”

Colao acknowledged incumbent players’ growth levels would be “hit” by Jio’s launch, but stressed that he didn’t know “by how much”. He also cited the likelihood of further “confusion” over reporting of operators’ active SIM card numbers, and the operational question over how well Jio’s voice-over-IP services perform during the launch phase.

Bankrolled by Mukesh Ambani, Chairman of Reliance Industries and India’s richest man, Jio is aiming to attract around one million subscribers-a-day during the Welcome Offer period, so bringing it up quickly to the 100 million-mark (and well beyond the 70 million-80 million that most analysts think the venture will need to turn a profit). However, reports since the launch have mooted slower uptake, in the region of 500, 000 users-per-day, with SIM card availability and service quality cited as possible factors.

Months before Jio ripples dissipate

Colao did not indicate when Vodafone is now likely to have sufficient visibility to enact the long-anticipated initial public offering (IPO), which is expected to see around 10% of the OpCo’s equity put in play. During his interview, Colao commented that “all the numbers will become more complicated, until February [2017], probably”, but further on in the conversation, said that “we need to prepare for fifteen months… of very careful analysis of what is going on, because it will be complicated”.

“ So far, we keep working [on the IPO]. I have to say this free offer makes things more difficult, because of course you cannot really do an IPO without stable numbers. When [we will] get stable numbers is a bit of a question mark now. So, for sure there is an impact. There will be at least an impact on the timing, based on this five months of unexpected delay of the real billing operation of Jio. So, we are still working, [but] the timing has become less clear. ” – Colao.

Jio move has M&A implications inside and outside India

Vodafone selected banking partners for the flotation in early-2016, and had, in more recent local media reports, been expected to file a draft prospectus for potential investors before the end of the year (Vodafonewatch, #143 and passim). As well as raising cash, with receipts of $2bn (£1.6bn/EUR1.8bn)-$3bn said to be targeted, the move has been mooted as having both: local political benefits, by making VfIn more of an “Indian” company; and global implications, by providing more certainty over VfIn’s value to Vodafone’s more emerging markets-sceptic M&A buddy Liberty Global.

During his Communacopia interview, Colao went on to reiterate that another likely outcome of Jio’s entrance would be local consolidation, beyond the series of smaller deals seen in India during recent months (including VfIn’s pending purchase of cableco YOU Broadband India, and speculation linking it with moves for Idea Cellular and Telenor India – Vodafonewatch, #145-#147). “Three years from now, there will be fewer players”, he said.

More cash for Indian money-pit

The Italian’s comments came as India’s latest spectrum auction took place, as scheduled, in early-October 2016, with both Jio and VfIn among the seven participants (Vodafonewatch, passim).

In the run‑up, VfIn was tipped to bid aggressively, in part to make up for its withdrawal from the 2010 Broadband Wireless Access (2.3GHz) sale that in effect gave rise to Jio’s inception (Vodafonewatch, 2010.06) — and VfIn indeed proved to the be the largest spender, laying out INR 202.8bn (£2.5bn/€2.7bn) on 1800MHz, 2.1GHz, and 2.5GHz rights.

VfIn — which remains stretched on spectrum resource when compared with other Group OpCos, despite laying out nearly INR 800bn on airwave rights this decade — said the purchases will enable it to enhance 4G services in key circles. It had boosted its coffers by securing around $7bn of equity funding from its parent Group prior to the sale.

A fuller report on the auction’s outcome will be published in the next Vodafonewatch report.

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Dark fibre access a quick-fix option, not a long-term solution

With the latest BCMR, the regulator is heading down the road towards passive remedies, but at a cautious pace, and in a manner that is to an extent at odds with the approach being put forward in the Strategic Review of Digital Communications (DCR) – BTwatch, #274, passim.

Under the BCMR, BT will be required, from October 2017, to offer access to dark fibre priced at the same rate as its existing active 1Gbps Ethernet service, less the long-run incremental costs of the latter service’s active elements.

However, the conclusions of the BCMR need to be considered in conjunction with the DCR. Ofcom has noted that while the DCR takes a ten-year perspective, the BCMR is compelled to put plans in place for the immediate three-year period.

The BCMR considered two types of passive remedy: duct-sharing and dark fibre access. Although the latter has been favoured, both BT and alternative infrastructure providers have been wary of the introduction of dark fibre access, which they consider could undermine more extensive infrastructure investment plans by making new services that still essentially rely on BT infrastructure a cheap and easy option for communications providers (CP).

These concerns may therefore be assuaged in the longer term as the DCR indicates a regulatory commitment to promoting greater physical infrastructure access, including to Openreach ducts, which is expected to appeal to altnets building their own competing networks. CityFibre, for example, has recently indicated that it anticipates being one of the largest customers for Openreach duct sharing should improved terms be made available.

This adds to the impression that the BCMR passive remedy decision was a compromise solution. It is providing a dark fibre product, priced at a level that may not make a resoundingly compelling alternative to existing Ethernet offerings but gives CPs more choice. It does so, however, without fundamentally undermining the incentives and business case for altnets looking to undertake deeper infrastructure investment.

We consider that this approach… provides incentives for efficient investment for BT and for rival infrastructure operators. It incentivises use of dark fibre where it provides benefits relative to active remedies; it ensures BT will continue to have a fair opportunity to recover its efficiently incurred costs; and it will require limited rebalancing of charges, so that charges to more price-sensitive customers do not need to increase in nominal terms. ” – Ofcom statement on dark fibre.

Like other companies who have invested in their own networks, we continue to believe that regulated dark fibre is the wrong approach. This charge control will defeat Ofcom’s objectives for infrastructure competition. This is a flawed piece of regulation that will not lead to the new networks that Ofcom want to see in the future. ” – BT response to BCMR.

Quality of service the biggest bugbear

BT has in recent quarters seen significant criticism from rivals regarding the provision of Ethernet services, and the poor level of performance has been recognised and criticised by Ofcom in the BCMR, with plans proposed to remedy the situation.

At this stage, the regulator is prioritising certainty over speed. Therefore, while lead times for Ethernet orders will remain long, BT will apparently be subject to significant consequences should it not meet targets.

Image: © Jordlet./Flickr.

Table of Contents

3 Executive brief
5 Group
6 Strategy
9 M&A
9 People
10 Global Technology
12 Group Commercial
18 Legal and regulatory
19 Supply chain
26 Profile
30 Europe
31 Germany
31 Ireland
34 Netherlands
35 Romania
36 Spain
37 UK
42 Africa, Middle East, and Asia‑Pacific Region
43 Australia — Vodafone Hutchison Australia
44 India
46 Egypt
47 Kenya — Safaricom
49 New Zealand
50 Vodacom — South Africa
53 Further reading
56 Index

Index

AAccenture 26
Aditya Birla Group
– Idea Cellular 7, 13, 15
AdMaxim 11
Affirmed Networks 11
Afilias Ltd
– mTLD Top Level Domain Ltd. (dotMobi) 11
Africa 12, 13, 24, 29, 42, 51
– Congo 48
– Egypt 46, 47
– Ghana 12
– Guinea 15, 16
– Kenya 14, 15, 47, 48, 49
– Nigeria 12, 15
– South Africa 50, 51
– Sub-Sahara 12, 13, 14, 16
– Uganda 12, 16, 24
– Zambia 12, 16
Afrimax Group 12, 14, 16
Agora Mobile 11
Altice Group 14
Amalgamated Telecom Holdings (ATH)
– Vodafone Fiji 14, 15, 16
Amdocs 9, 26, 28
América Móvil 14
Americas
– Brazil 12, 14
– Canada 11, 14, 33, 51
– Chile 12, 14
– Latin America 13, 14, 29
– USA 11
– – States
– – – New York 6, 40
Apigee Corp. 11
Apple 34
– iPhone 34
Argyle Data 11
Asia Mobility Initiative (AMI Alliance) 13, 15
Asia-Pacific 13, 15, 16, 24
– Afghanistan 13
– Australia 14, 15, 43, 44
– China 16, 19, 47
– Fiji 14
– French Polynesia 14
– Guam 14
– Hong Kong 15
– India 6, 7, 9, 13, 14, 15, 24, 44, 51
– – Licence Circles
– – – Chennai 44
– – – Kolkata 24
– – – Madhya Pradesh 24
– – – West Bengal & Andaman and Nicobar 24
– – Reserve Bank of India 49
– – Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) 47
– Indonesia 13, 15, 16
– Japan 12, 15, 43
– Malaysia 12, 13, 15
– New Zealand 49
– – Rural Broadband Initiative (RBI) 49
– Pakistan 16
– Philippines 15
– Singapore 13, 15, 16
– South Korea 16
– Sri Lanka 13, 15
– Taiwan 16
– Thailand 16
– Turkmenistan 16
– Uzbekistan 15
– Vietnam 16
ASPire Group 16
Axiata Group Bhd (TM International) 13, 15
– India (Idea Cellular, see also Aditya Birla) 7, 13, 15
– Malaysia (Celcom (Malaysia) Bhd) 13, 15
– Singapore (Mobile One, see separate) 13, 15, 16
– Sri Lanka (Dialog Telekom PLC, see separate) 13, 15BBarclays plc 24
Be Heard Group 21
– agenda21 21
Beintoo 11
Belgacom Group 14, 15
– Belgacom Mobile NV/SA (Proximus) 14
– Tango Mobile SA (Tele2 Luxembourg) 15
Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd (BSNL) 44
Bharti Group 14, 15
– Airtel 14, 15
– Indus Towers 14, 15
Bité Group 15
– Lithuania 15
BMW Group 13
Botswana Telecommunications Corp. 14
Brilliant Telecommunications Inc. 11
BT Group 19, 24, 33, 40, 41
– Openreach 19, 40CCapgemini 24
CarePay 48
Caringo Inc. 10, 11
CellEra Inc. 11
China Mobile 16
China Telecom 47
Chunghwa Telecom 16
Cognia 11
Conexus Mobile Alliance 13, 15, 16
CyTA
– Cytamobile 14DDatora Telecom 12, 14
Dentsu
– Dentsu Aegis Network 21
Deutsche Telekom 10, 15, 19, 24
– Europe
– – Netherlands 34
– – UK (EE) 37, 40, 41, 44
– Germany 34
– Systems Solutions
– – T-Systems 24
– – – South Africa 24
Device Insight 11
Diageo plc 24
DTAC 16
du (Emirates Integrated Telecommunications) 12, 16, 26, 27EeBay 10
– Expertmaker 10, 11
EE (see DT, FT) 37, 40, 41, 44
eGain Communications Ltd 26
Elisa 14
Embee Mobile 11
Emblaze Group
– European Telecom 22
Emirates Airlines 16
Entel PCS 12, 14
Ericsson 10, 28
Etisalat 46
– Etisalat Misr (Egypt) 46
Europe 20, 21, 23, 24, 29, 30, 51
– Armenia 14
– Austria 14
– Bulgaria 14
– Croatia 14
– Cyprus 14
– Czech Republic 10
– Denmark 14, 15, 16
– Estonia 14
– Faroe Islands 14, 15
– Finland 14
– France 14
– Germany 11, 18, 31, 34
– – Länder
– – – Bavaria (Munich) 9
– – – Berlin 31, 34
– – – Hamburg 34
– – – Lower Saxony (Hanover) 34
– – – North Rhine-Westphalia (Düsseldorf) 34
– – – Saxony (Dresden) 34
– Greece 16
– Guernsey 14, 15
– Iceland 15
– Ireland 11, 15, 31, 33
– Italy 7, 10, 15, 41
– Jersey 14, 15
– Latvia 15
– Lithuania 15
– Luxembourg 14, 15
– Macedonia 15
– Netherlands 10, 12, 33, 34
– Norway 14, 15
– Poland 15
– Portugal 18, 27, 28
– Romania 35
– Russia 15
– Serbia 15
– Slovenia 16
– Spain 10, 18, 36, 37, 38, 43
– – Comision Nacional de los Mercados y la Competencia 36, 37
– Sweden 9, 11, 14, 16
– Switzerland 16
– Turkey 10, 27, 51
– Ukraine 16
– United Kingdom (UK) 10, 11, 15, 18, 19, 21, 23, 28, 29, 37, 38, 40, 41, 43, 44
– – Office of Communications (Ofcom) 37, 38, 40
European Union 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23
– European Commission 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23
Evolution Robotics Inc. 11FFacebook 21, 47
– WhatsApp 21
FarCare 11
Far Eastern Group
– Far EasTone Telecommunications Co., Ltd. 16
Finsphere Corp. 11
Flybits 11
Ford Motor Company
– Volvo 13
Forthnet 16GGameGround 11
Globacom Ltd 12, 14, 15
Globe Telecom 15
Goldman Sachs 6, 40
Google 10, 21
– JIBE 10, 11
GSM Association (GSMA) 22, 46, 47
– Mobile World Congress 27HHeadwater Partners 11
Hewlett-Packard 28
HipLink Software (formerly Semotus Solutions)
– Clickmarks 11
Huawei Technologies 10, 19, 34, 48
Humin 11
Hutchison Whampoa 14, 15
– HTIL 15
– Hutchison Telecommunications Hong Kong Ltd (Hutchinson Telecom/HTHKH/3 Hong Kong) 15
– Vodafone Hutchison Australia Pty Ltd (VHA, (see Vodafone) 14, 15, 43, 44
Hyundai 13IIBM 26, 27, 33
Indus Towers 14, 15
INETCO Systems 11
InfraCo Management Services 51
ItsOn 11JJuniper Networks
– Brilliant Telecommunications 11
Juvo Mobile 9KKPMG International 49
KPN 24, 33, 34
KT Corp. (KTC/KTF) 16LLebara Group 43
Lebara Group
– Lebara Mobile 43
Liberty Global 7
– Virgin Media 40
Lite Access Technologies 51MMarket segments
– Mobile broadband 13, 43
– Mobile virtual network (MVNA/MVNE/MVNO) 12, 23, 43
– Network-sharing 15, 36, 44, 50
– Over-the-top (OTT) 9, 18
– Value-added services (VAS) 16, 31, 38, 46
– Voice 6, 9, 11, 12, 31, 37, 43, 44
Microsoft
– Skype 21
Middle East 27, 29
– Bahrain 14
– Egypt 46, 47
– – National Telecommunication Regulatory Authority (NTRA) 47
– Iraq 14, 15
– Israel 11
– Kuwait 14, 15
– Qatar 16
– Saudi Arabia 14, 15
– United Arab Emirates 16, 26
mimik technology 11
MobileIron 10, 11
Mobile One (Singapore) 13, 15, 16
Morse Plc 44
Motorola Mobility Holdings Inc. 44NNaratte 11
National Audit Office 44
Neotel (Pty) Ltd (SNO Telecommunications, see also Reliance) 50, 51
Netflix Inc. 35
Nexperience Ltd 11
Nokia 26, 27, 43
Novabase SGPS SA 26, 27
NTT 12, 14, 15
Nuance Communications
– SnapIn Software 11OOBS Medical 11
Ooredoo 16
– Indonesia (Indosat, see separate) 16
OpenCloud 27
Oracle 26, 27
– Sun Microsystems
– – SavaJe Technologies 11
Orange
– Orange 14, 36, 46
– Spain 36
– UK (see EE) 37, 40, 41, 44PPacific Mobile Telecom (PMT) 14
Perfecto Mobile 10, 11
Philippine Long Distance Telephone Co. (PLDT) 15
Pine Labs 9
Polkomtel 15
Pontis 9, 11
PT Indosat Tbk (see Qtel) 16
P&T Luxembourg
– LuxGSM 15QQualia Media 11
Quixey 11RReliance Industries Limited (RIL) 6
Rogers Communications 14
Roshan (Telecom Development Company Afghanistan Ltd) 13
– M-Paisa 13SSaavn 9
Safaricom 15, 26, 27, 47, 48, 49, 51
– Executives
– – Baillie, Les 48
– – Collymore, Bob 47, 49
– M-PESA 47, 48
Samsung 34
SAP 21
Saudi Telecom Company 47
Sigma Systems Canada 33
Singapore Telecom
– Amobee Media Systems 11
– Optus (Australia) 43
Sistema
– Mobile TeleSystems 14, 15, 16
Skorpios Technologies 11
SK Telecom 16
SMART Communications 15
SmarTone-Vodafone 15
SoftBank Corp. 15
– SoftBank Mobile 15
Sonus Networks 10
Spartan Capital Holdings
– Polkomtel 15
Sprint Nextel 24
Supreme Court 38
Swisscom 16
– Swisscom Mobile 16
Synchronoss Technologies Inc. 31TTalkTalk Telecom Group plc 40
Tangoe 33
Taqua 10, 11
Tata Group
– Tata Communications
– – Neotel (see separate listing) 50, 51
TDC 14, 15, 16
Technology
– 2.5G 7
– 2G 7, 43, 44
– – GSM 22, 46
– 3G 43, 44, 49
– 4G 6, 10, 35, 43, 44, 46, 47, 49
– – Long Term Evolution (LTE) 10, 12, 34, 43, 44
– – – LTE TDD 12
– – VoLTE (Voice-over-LTE) 10
– 5G 19, 20, 21, 29, 31, 34
– Cloud computing 24, 31
– Data centre 31, 48
– DSL 28
– Fibre 18, 19, 28, 31, 36, 37, 40, 44, 50, 51
– FTTH 36, 37, 51
– IPTV 28
– M2M 11, 14, 15, 16
– Mobile TV 35
– Narrow Band Internet of Things (NB-IoT) 10
– NGN 50, 51
– OSS 28
– SIM 6, 23
– Smartphone 9, 11, 31, 34, 35
– Spectrum 7, 10, 20, 21, 34, 35, 37, 43, 46
– – 700 MHz 7, 46
– – 800 MHz 7, 10, 34, 35
– – 900 MHz 7, 46
– – 1800 MHz 7, 34, 35, 46
– – 2100 MHz 7, 46
– – 2500 MHz 7
– – 2600 MHz 34
– TETRA 44
– VoIP 6
– W-LAN 12, 20
Telecel, Paraguay 26
Telecom Egypt 46
Telefónica Group 10, 34, 36, 37
– Europe
– – España 36
– – UK 37
– Movistar 36, 37
Telekom Austria Group 14, 15, 16
– Austria
– – A1 14
– Bulgaria
– – Mobiltel 14
– Croatia
– – Vipnet 14
– Macedonia
– – Vip operator 15
– Slovenia
Si.mobil 16
Telenor ASA 7
Telstra 43
TIBCO Software Inc. 26, 27
TomTom 13
Top Optimized Technologies 11
Truecaller 9
T-Systems 24UUEFA 37
– Champions League 37
Usaha Tegas Group Holdings Bhd
– Maxis Communication, Malaysia 12VVasona Networks 11
Vinaphone (Vietnam) 16
Visa
– PlaySpan 11
VisionOSS (VOSS) 11
Vivendi 14
– SFR (Société Française de Radiotéléphone) 14
Vodacom Group 12, 14, 15, 16, 24, 48, 50, 51
– Congo 48
– Group 12, 24
– Mozambique 48
– South Africa 50, 51
– Tanzania 48
– Vodacom Business 12, 50, 51
Vodafone
– Africa, Middle East, and Asia Pacific Region (AMAP) 24, 42
– – Africa 12, 13, 24, 29, 42, 51
– – Asia 13, 15, 24
– – Australia 14, 15, 43, 44
– – – VHA Pty. Ltd (see Hutchison Whampoa) 14, 15, 43, 44
– – Egypt 27, 46, 47
– – Ghana 12
– – India 6, 7, 13, 14, 15, 24, 44, 51
– – – Indus Towers 14, 15
– – Japan 15
– – Kenya (see Safaricom) 14, 15, 26, 27, 47, 48, 49, 51
– – Middle East 27, 29
– – Mozambique 48
– – New Zealand 24, 49
– – Pacific 13, 14, 24
– – Qatar (see Vodafone and Qatar Foundation and Vodafone Qatar) 16, 34
– – South Africa (see Vodacom) 12, 14, 15, 16, 24, 48, 50, 51
– – Turkey 10, 27, 51
– ASPire Group 16
– Europe Region
– – Cable & Wireless Worldwide 41, 44
– – Czech Republic 10, 13, 34
– – Germany 11, 13, 18, 31, 33, 34
– – – KDG Holding GmbH (Kabel Deutschland) 9
– – Greece 16, 34
– – Hungary 24
– – Ireland 11, 15, 27, 28, 31, 33
– – Italy 7, 10, 15, 41
– – Malta 16
– – Netherlands 10, 12, 14, 34
– – Portugal 18, 26, 27, 28
– – – CelFocus (see Novabase) 26, 27, 28, 29
– – Romania 35
– – Spain 10, 18, 36, 37, 38, 43
– – – Grupo Corporativo Ono (ONO) 36, 37, 38
– – UK 10, 11, 14, 15, 18, 19, 21, 23, 24, 27, 28, 29, 34, 37, 38, 40, 41, 43, 44
– Executives
– – Baird, Tony 49
– – Brenneis, Erik 24
– – Chopra, Naveen 24
– – Coimbra, António 36, 38
– – Colao, Vittorio 6, 7, 21, 26, 40, 41
– – Elms, Ben 24
– – Geldmacher, Jan 24
– – Jeffery, Nick 24, 41
– – Joosub, Shameel 51
– – Kirk, Matthew 19
– – Kuisch, Eric 31
– – Lloyd, Dan 43
– – Mabunda, Nyimpini 24
– – Michelangelo, Giacco 24
– – Millroy, Kevin 43
– – Patel, Phil 24
– – Read, Nick 31
– – Reinisch, Markus 18, 23
– – Rieger, Steve 24
– – Rook, Ivo 24
– – Schay, Daniel 24
– – Senecal de Fonseca, Michelle 24
– – Sood, Sunil 44
– – Vanoosthuyze, Frederic 33
– Ex-executives
– – Laurence, Guy 14
– – Sarin, Arun 9
– Group 9, 21, 24, 33
– – Commercial
– – – Invitation Digital 11
– – Headquarters 10
– – Partner Markets 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 26
– – – Afghanistan (Roshan) 13
– – – Africa (Afrimax) 12, 14, 16
– – – Austria (A1/Telekom Austria) 14, 15, 16
– – – Bahrain (Zain) 14
– – – Belgium (Proximus) 14, 15
– – – Brazil (Grupo Datora Telecom/Vodafone Brasil) 12, 14
– – – Bulgaria (Mobiltel) 14
– – – Channel Islands (Airtel-Vodafone Guernsey/Jersey) 14, 15
– – – Chile (Entel PCS) 12, 14
– – – Croatia (Vipnet/Telekom Austria) 14
– – – Cyprus (Cytamobile-Vodafone) 14
– – – Estonia (Elisa) 14
– – – Fiji (Vodafone Fiji) 14, 15, 16
– – – Finland (Elisa) 14
– – – France (SFR/Vivendi) 14
– – – Hong Kong (Hutchison Telecom) 15
– – – Iceland (Vodafone Iceland) 14, 15
– – – Kenya (Safaricom) 15, 26, 27, 47, 48, 49, 51
– – – Latvia and Lithuania (Bité) 15
– – – Luxembourg (Tango) 15
– – – Malaysia (Celcom) 13, 15
– – – Philippines (SMART) 15
– – – Poland (Polkomtel) 15
– – – Russia and CIS (MTS) 14, 15, 16
– – – Scandinavia (TDC) 14, 15, 16
– – – Serbia (Vip mobile/Telekom Austria) 15
– – – Singapore (StarHub) 16
– – – Slovenia (Si.mobil/Telekom Austria) 16
– – – Sri Lanka (Dialog Axiata) 13, 15
– – – Switzerland (Swisscom) 16
– – – Taiwan (FarEasTone) 16
– – – Thailand (TrueMove) 16
– – – United Arab Emirates (du) 12, 16, 26, 27
– – Vodafone Global Enterprise (VGE) 24, 33
– – Vodafone Ventures 9
– – – Affirmed Networks (see separate) 11
– – – Argyle Data (see separate) 11
– – – biozoom Services (now liquidated) 11
– – – Caringo (see separate) 10, 11
– – – CellEra (see separate) 11
– – – Cognia (see separate) 11
– – – Device Insight (see separate) 11
– – – Finsphere (see separate) 11
– – – Flybits (see separate) 11
– – – Headwater Partners (see separate) 11
– – – ItsOn (see separate) 11
– – – Key Revolution Ltd, The (now liquidated) 11
– – – mimik technology (see separate) 11
– – – Naratte (see separate) 11
– – – OBS Medical (see separate) 11
– – – Perfecto Mobile (see separate) 10, 11
– – – Pontis (see separate) 9, 11
– – – Qualia Media (see separate) 11
– – – Quixey (see separate) 11
– – – Skorpios Technologies (see separate) 11
– – – Taqua (see separate) 10, 11
– – – Top Optimized Technologies (see separate) 11
– – – United Hubbing Ltd (now liquidated) 11
– – – Vasona Networks (see separate) 11
– – – VOSS (see separate) 11
– Products
– – At Home 28
– – Casa 28
– – Casa TV 28
– – Liberty (Malta) 7
– – Mobile Broadband 43
– – My Vodafone 28
– – One 37
– – One Net 28
– – Tango 15
– – Vodafone TV 28
– Project Spring 28
Vodafone Iceland 14, 15
Vodafone Qatar Q.S.C. 34
Volkswagen 13WWPP
– G2 Worldwide 48YYelp 10, 11
– Qype 11ZZain (MTC) 12, 14, 15, 47

About

About Vodafonewatch

Report: #148
Covering: October 2016
Published: October 2016
Next report: November 2016
For more information visit: Vodafonewatch