• DT appears to increasingly be looking outside its four walls for R&D gains.

Deutsche Telekom (DT) remained coy on the reasons behind a further drop in its research and development (R&D) budget.

During the year to 31 December 2017 (FY17), its R&D spend fell by 31%, to EUR57m — its lowest outlay for several years. The budget dropped by nearly half between a peak in FY15 and the trough in FY17. The Group’s Annual Reports do not explain the cutbacks, nor did DT’s Investor Relations department respond to Deutsche Telekomwatch queries before going to press.

DT’s R&D budgets remain relatively small to begin with. In FY17, the Group generated net revenue of nearly EUR75bn, so Group R&D expenditure was a remarkably tiny 0.076% of net sales during that year.

The Group’s definition of R&D has remained constant. It includes ‘pre-production’ R&D, such as the search for alternative products, processes, systems and services. The Group, however, does not include the cost of developing system and user software with the aim of increasing productivity and providing more effective IT support for business processes.

Curiously, R&D headcount started to rise recently, from 2, 800 in FY15 to 3, 000 in FY17, despite the fall in overall expenditure. DT does not elaborate on the expertise of the new recruits.

Here comes DTCP

DT warns in its Annual Reports that R&D figures cannot be viewed in isolation. The Group has a ‘three-pronged‘ investment strategy comprising in-house developments, partnerships, and startup funding. Leading up to FY15, there was a Group peak in what might be termed traditional R&D spend.

Deutsche Telekom Capital Partners (DTCP), the investment management arm of DT, superseded T-Venture and became officially operational in April 2015. In DT’s FY16 Annual Report, the Group stated plans to invest a total of EUR450m via DTCP over the unit’s first five years of operation. A string of recent DTCP investments, throughout 2017 and early-2018, may well suggest DT has divert a portion of its traditional R&D budget to VC activity (Deutsche Telekomwatch, #66 and passim). Corporate VC has been derided in some quarters as an ineffective approach to business innovation, but DT is clearly not one of its sceptics.

Image: T-Labs / Medium.

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Contents

EXECUTIVE BRIEF

GROUP

Deals

SoftBank succumbs on Sprint-T-Mobile US merger [p6]

  • Table 1: People movement highlights

Supply chain

Data spinout secures key role in media buying [p10]

  • Agencies lose influence

Group Development

KNIPPR set for June shutdown [p12]

  • Screen return likely

Technology & Innovation

Decline in DT’s traditional R&D budget continues [p13]

  • Here comes DTCP
  • Table 2: Ups and downs of Group R&D expenditure

Google could supplant Nokia as EAN partner [p14]

  • A pre-take-off downer for EAN

DT joins TEAC club to disrupt network suppliers [p14]

  • Table 3: Eins, zwei, drei. First batch of startups to join DT’s TEAC in Germany
  • TEAC your startups well
  • Paris, London, Seoul, Berlin

Cracking the open source code

GERMANY

Partnerships

More content allies sign up to StreamOn [p17]

  • The big mo

Verimi goes live in Germany [p18]

  • DT watchful
  • Not a zero sum game
  • Table 4: Verimi ‘green button’ service providers at launch

EUROPE

Croatia

Six years later, TeraStream breaks cover [p22]

  • A long and winding Stream
  • Watch this space

Ericsson Nikola Tesla flags another Croatian mobile win [p24]Czech Republic

Czech hybrid broadband service gets a refresh [p25]

  • A stopgap

Greece

OTE uncaps another Coca-Cola HBC IT project [p26]

  • Love-hate relationship

SYSTEMS SOLUTIONS

Strategy

T-Sys performs its own digital transformation [p29]

  • All the toys
  • Al-Saleh just warming up, with more dramatic moves likely in offing

Microsoft backs T-Sys’ digital game-plan at Messe [p31]

  • Microsoft: public friend number-one?
  • IoT at Messe: announcements and re-announcements
  • DT doesn’t make a stand at CeBIT

Contracts

Mixed messaging as T-Sys nets Sparda “mega” IT deal [p34]

  • T-Sys evidently still captivated by IT outsourcing

USA

Strategy

FCC ignores TMUS red flag on mmWave conditions [p36]

  • Figure 1: Nationwide split of available mmWave spectrum
  • Things troubling TMUS
  • It’s also the economics, stupid
  • What’s all the UMFUS about?
  • Table 5: Auction 101: 28GHz frequencies under the hammer*
  • Table 6: Auction 102: 24GHz frequencies under the hammer*
  • Scheme needs fresh air

FURTHER READING

INDEX

Index

A

Africa 34
Airrays 15
Alcatel-Lucent 9, 14
Allianz 18
Alphabet 14
– Google 14, 18
América Móvil 9
Americas
– Canada 12
– United States of America (USA) 6, 7, 14, 35, 37, 38
– – Federal Communications Commission (FCC) 36, 37, 38, 39
– – Government 7
Apigee Corp. 14
Asia-Pacific
– China 7, 18
– Japan 7
– South Korea 15
AT&T 7, 9, 17, 36, 37
Axel Springer AG 18

B

BT Group 6, 15
Business Connexion 9

C

Capgemini 9
CeBIT 31, 33
Cinco Capital 15
Cisco Systems 8, 23
Cloudera, Inc. 10
Coca-Cola 26
Cortina Systems 23

D

Daimler AG 18
Deutsche Bank 18, 19
Deutsche Telekom 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 36, 37, 39
– Corporate
– – Headquarters 15
– Deutsche Telekom Capital Partners 13, 15
– – emetriq 10
– Europe
– – Austria 8, 22, 25
– – Croatia (Hrvatski Telekom) 17, 22, 23, 24
– – Czech Republic 22, 25
– – Greece (see OTE) 17, 23
– – Hungary (see Magyar Telekom) 8, 23
– – International Carrier Sales & Services (ICSS) 8, 23
– – Montenegro (see Magyar Telekom) 24
– – Netherlands 8, 12, 17
– – Poland (Polska Telefonia Cyfrowa/PTC) 8, 17, 24
– – Slovakia (Slovak Telekom/T-Mobile) 25
– European Aviation Network 14
– Executives
– – Al Saleh, Adel 29, 31
– – Arnold, Heinrich 29
– – Chocholek, Mariusz 8
– – Clauberg, Axel 15
– – Czajkowski, Pawel 8
– – Höttges, Timotheus 7, 31
– – Janssen, Uwe 15
– – Klingenburg, Peter 29
– – Legere, John 6
– – Lorenz, Arndt 29
– – Lorenz, Peter 29
– – Markowski, Piotr 8
– – Metzger, Hansjorg 9
– – Nafziger, Rolf 23
– – Pabst, Magnus 9
– – Ray, Neville 7
– – Rekasi, Tibor 8
– – Sievert, Mike 7
– – van der Walt, Mardia 8
– Ex-executives
– – Arnoldner, Thomas 9
– Germany 6, 10, 17, 18, 19, 23, 25, 26
– – T-Online 10
– Investments
– – Magyar Telekom (see separate) 8, 9, 23
– – OTE (see separate) 26
– Product and Innovation
– – hubraum 6
– – Telekom Innovation Laboratories (T-Labs) 19, 29
– Products and services
– – Connected Car 25
– – StreamOn 17
– Systems Solutions 28
– – T-Systems 8, 9, 10, 19, 26, 29, 31, 33, 34
– – – Detecon 29, 30
– – – South Africa 9
– – – Telekom Security 19, 33, 34
– Technology
– – BNG (Broadband Network Gateway) 23
– – TeraStream 22, 23
– Toll Collect 33
– USA 6, 7, 8, 9, 14, 17, 19, 36, 37, 38
Deutsche Telekom Capital Partners 13, 15

E

Ericsson 12, 23, 24
– Croatia (see Ericsson Nikola Tesla) 24
Ericsson Nikola Tesla d.d. (see Ericsson) 24
Espial 12
Europe
– Austria 9, 22, 33
– Belgium 12, 15
– Croatia 9, 22, 23, 24
– Czech Republic 22, 25, 33
– France 15
– Germany 6, 7, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 23, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34
– – Bundesnetzagentur für Elektrizität, Gas, Telekommunikation, Post und Eisenbahnen (BNetzA, RegTP, FNA, or German Federal Network Agency) 17, 19
– Greece 26
– Hungary 8
– Macedonia 9
– Montenegro 24
– Netherlands 6, 12
– Poland 8, 24
– Romania 17
– Slovakia 25
– Switzerland 8, 9
– Turkey 17
– United Kingdom (UK) 15
European Union 17, 18, 19
– European Commission 18

F

Facebook 12, 14, 18
– Telecom Infra Project 14
Fon 6
France Télécom
– Mobistar 12
– Orange 12, 15, 17
Fraunhofer Institute 32
Fujitsu 9

G

Giesecke & Devrient 18
Gogo 14
GSM Association
– Mobile World Congress 30, 31, 32
GSM Association (GSMA) 18, 19

H

High-Tech Gründerfonds 15
Hrvatski Telekom (see DT, Croatia) 17, 22, 23, 24
– Combis d.o.o. 23
– MAXtv 22
Huawei Technologies 25, 31

I

ImageWare Systems 19
Infosys Technologies 9
Inmarsat 14

J

JIBE Inc. 14

K

KPN
– BASE 12

L

Lufthansa 18

M

Magyar Telekom (see DT) 8, 23
– Executives
– – Mattheisen, Christopher 8
– Montenegro (Crnogorski Telekom) 24
– T-Systems Hungary 8, 26
Market segments
– Machine-to-machine (M2M) 31
– Over-the-top (OTT) 12
– Value-added services (VAS) 25
MetroPCS Communications Inc. 7
Microsoft 29, 31, 32
Middle East 34
Mindshare 10

N

Neustar 10
Nokia 14, 23

O

Objective Partners 10
OTE (Hellenic Telecom. Org. SA, see DT) 26
– Cosmote 17, 23
– – Greece 17, 23

P

PPF Group 33

R

RTL Group 17

S

Salesforce 29
SAP 26, 29, 30, 31, 32
Singapore Telecom 17
SK Telecom 15
Slovak Telekom (see DT, Slovakia) 25
SOFTBANK CORP. 6, 7
– Son, Masayoshi 7
Sprint Corporation 6, 7, 36
– Boost Mobile 7
Swisscom 17

T

Technology
– 2.5G 7
– 2G 7
– – GSM 18, 19
– 4G
– – Long Term Evolution (LTE) 14, 25, 32
– 5G 7, 8, 9, 14, 32, 36, 37, 38
– Blockchain 19
– DSL 25
– Fibre 12, 23, 25
– IP 15, 23
– IPTV 12, 23
– M2M 31
– MMS 29, 30
– Narrowband Internet of Things (NB-IoT) 32
– OpenStack 15
– R&D 13, 15
– SDN 23
– Spectrum 36, 37, 38, 39
– – 1800 MHz 12
– – 2100 MHz 12
– – 2600 MHz 12
– Telemedicine 23
– Web Services 14
– W-LAN 6, 14, 17
Tele2 12
– Netherlands 12
Telefonica Group 18
– Europe 22
Telekom Austria 8, 9
– Austria
– – A1 8
Telenet 12
Telkom South Africa 9
Twitter Inc. 22

V

Value-added services 25
Verimi 18, 19
Verizon Communications 36, 37
Virgin Group
– Virgin Mobile 7
Vodafone 8, 17, 18, 19, 22
– Europe Region
– – Czech Republic 22
– – Germany 17, 18, 19
– – Hungary 8

W

WPP 10

About

About Deutsche Telekomwatch

Report: #72
Published: April 2018
Next report: May 2018
For more information visit: Deutsche Telekomwatch